Moby + Little Pine: Sustainable Activism

Moby Little Pine

If ever there was a restaurant with a clear vision and sense of purpose, fueled by a passion for something greater than the restaurant itself, it’s Little Pine — an organic, vegan restaurant in the Silver Lake neighborhood of L.A. Little Pine was created and is overseen by Moby, well-known musician, environmentalist, and animal rights activist. What makes Little Pine a first of its kind is that 100% of its profits go to animal welfare organizations.

Last week, I had the opportunity to meet Moby at his restaurant. I used to live in Silver Lake and I remember the art deco building on Rowena Avenue that had then stood empty, so it was intriguing to see it transformed into a beautiful, inviting restaurant space and to be greeted by Moby himself, a personal hero of mine. When I arrived, Moby was writing the evening’s details on the chalkboard to be displayed outside the restaurant. Moments later, we were having a conversation about how Little Pine came about, the experience he hopes to provide for his guests, and how he made the decision to commit all proceeds to the animal rights movement to which he is so deeply committed.

Moby is in the unique position to essentially treat Little Pine as a nonprofit. Yet, his approach to creating a restaurant that embodies the cultural progress he hopes to see in the world can provide knowledge and inspiration for restaurants and the larger dining community, vegan and non-vegan.

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Sightseers: The Best Bay View Restaurants in San Francisco

Traveling to San Francisco? The Bay Area features a wide range of restaurant dining options, some with spectacular bay views — all depending upon your vantage point. You can dine with views of the Golden Gate Bridge, just underneath the glittering lights of the Bay Bridge, see the famous skyline from the East Bay, or take in the nitty gritty working waterfront. You can sip on drinks from high atop Nob Hill, slurp oysters at a high-end seafood restaurant, or nibble on Chinese spareribs at a tropical getaway. Here are some top picks for the best bay view restaurants in San Francisco.

Waterbar, San Francisco
This glamorous seafood restaurant right under the Bay Bridge is an ideal place, day or night, to enjoy the vistas. Known for stunning floor-to-ceiling tropical aquariums and a firm commitment to sustainability and transparency, the restaurant offers a menu that even calls out the captains and fishing boats. It’s a prime spot for oysters with as many as 16 different types on any given day, and a daily pick is available for just $1.05 each from 11:30-5:30PM, with a nickel going to charity. It’s also a terrific place to indulge in a whole Dungeness crab or crab cocktail. Make a reservation at Waterbar.

Best Bay View Restaurants in San Francisco

La Mar Cebicheria Peruana, San Francisco
This Peruvian restaurant from acclaimed chef Gaston Acurio has a sunny deck and enticing specialties including empanadas, cebiches, and causas. It’s also a great place to try a Pisco cocktail. Or two. Arriving via the bay? La Mar is San Francisco’s only waterfront restaurant that offers complimentary boat parking for three hours. Make a reservation at La Mar Cebicheria Peruana.

Best Bay View Restaurants in San Francisco

EPIC Steak, San Francisco
With a newly added outside bar, the patio at Epic is more appealing than ever. This restaurant is as adept with steak as it is with delicate pasta and luscious fresh vegetables, such as a recent special of jumbo asparagus with a poached egg, Banyuls vinaigrette, and Cotija cheese. The best deal just might be the BBB, a bacon cheddar wagyu burger served with fries, a Budweiser, and a brownie for just $20. Add a 4th B — a shot of Michter’s bourbon — for another $5. Watch stormy days from inside or sit under the sunshine yellow umbrellas for lunch or drinks after work. Make a reservation at EPIC Steak.

Best Bay View Restaurants in San Francisco

ATwater Tavern, San Francisco
The latest addition to the San Francisco waterfront dining scene is ATwater Tavern. Located just past the baseball stadium, it’s the perfect place to celebrate a win, drown your sorrows should the Giants lose, or just wait until the traffic dies town before heading home after a game. The solid grill-focused menu offers plenty of seafood and a wide range of beer and wine on tap. Drink or dine from inside or out, upstairs or down, and see the workings of the port of San Francisco. Make a reservation at ATwater Tavern.

Best Bay View Restaurants in San Francisco

Top of the Mark, San Francisco
From Nob Hill at the top of the Intercontinental Mark Hopkins Hotel, you’ll enjoy great views of the City, the Golden Gate Bridge, and the Marin Headlands, as well as Alcatraz Island and Fisherman’s Wharf. During World War II, servicemen would meet and toast the Golden Gate Bridge before shipping out in hopes that this good luck ritual would bring them safely home. Their wives and sweethearts would head to the northwest corner of the lounge to watch them depart, earning this famous spot the nickname “Weepers’ Corner.” The lounge is known for a creative martini menu and offers small bites in the evenings and an extensive brunch buffet on Sundays. Make a reservation at Top of the Mark.

Best Bay View Restaurants in San Francisco

Greens, San Francisco
Originally opened as part of the San Francisco Zen Center, for 35 years this restaurant located at Fort Mason has offered stunning marina and bay spectacles all the way out to the Golden Gate Bridge. The food here is vegetarian and draws from various cuisines around the world. Much of the produce is sourced from nearby Green Gulch Farm, a residential Zen community and organic farm located just an hour away. The carefully curated wine list focuses on small producers. Make a reservation at Greens.

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10 Things We Learned at the 2016 Cherry Bombe Jubilee

OpenTable had the privilege of being a sponsor of the 2016 Cherry Bombe Jubilee held yesterday at Manhattan’s Highline Hotel. Culinary legends, journalists, small business owners, and more gathered to listen, learn, and get inspired by the past and excited for the future of women in food. Here are 10 takeaways, ICYMI.

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Make soup. The Hemsley sisters of UK catering company Hemsley + Hemsley are huge soup and bone broth advocates. “This should be the first things kids learn to make.”

“Get a job in a kitchen; it makes you a better boss.” Amanda Hess had the privilege of working in a completely civilized kitchen under Jodi Adams, but subsequent gigs weren’t quite as heavenly, and she was inspired to lead based on lessons learned at the former.

Looking for the next big thing in food (or any industry)? Look for white space. Find out what’s missing and fill the void.

Don’t get too judge-y about non-organic labels. A lot of farmers aren’t growing certified organic because they simply cannot afford to lose an entire crop to disease or pests. Their profit margins are already perilously thin; according to the USDA, most farmers make less than $80,000. That’s not much money for folks who need to be a chemist, a scientist, and a mechanic in order to manage their farms.

Mental illness, such as depression and anxiety, is prevalent in the culinary industry. This is due, in large part, to the overwhelming demands of the job. Only 3.5% of respondents to a survey on indicated that their mental health issues are NOT tied to the profession. If you’re suffering, you can visit the site (founded by foodista Kat Kinsman) for support and resources.

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A restaurant owner will always hire a woman as a chef – if she’s the owner. Back in the day (the day being 1982), female chefs were a rarity – and even more so if they weren’t chef-owners of their own restaurants. The critic Mimi Sheraton counted just one who was a hired gun at the time. Things have shifted, but there’s still quite a way to go.Continue Reading

Frost and Bloom: A Connected Event with Vedge + Vernick in Philadelphia


“There is no beauty without some strangeness.” — Edgar Allan Poe

Under the cold there was, in fact, gold. This week, on a snowy evening in Philadelphia, OpenTable gathered with foodies, lifestyle contributors, and local influencers and chefs Kate Jacoby and Rich Landau of venerated plant-forward restaurant Vedge and Greg Vernick of new American favorite Vernick Food & Drink for Frost and Bloom, an unlikely Valentine’s Day soiree that is part of Connected, our series of talks and gatherings that bring together the restaurant and tech worlds with food, drink, and local culture.


Seeking a deeper and unconventional connection to the notion of love, we set out to dig deep within the chill of winter for true connections — to food, to drink, and to one another, turning the holiday and its all-too-often saccharine associations on its head. Drawing inspiration from mavericks such as Saint Valentine, Chaucer, and Spenser, Philadelphia’s storied The Mask and Wig Club was given an enchanting costume of winter blooms and evocative artwork from Nitsua, Kyle Huff, and Conrad Benner, curated by OpenTable brand director Cort Cunningham, and the intrigue kicked off at 6:30PM with food and drink to mirror the mood dreamed up by these top chefs and Vedge beverage director Ross Maloof.


We shrugged off the chill of the evening within the warm confines of The Mask and Wig Club as hearts were gently melted with intoxicating piano music, and we sipped one-of-a-kind creations from Maloof that embodied the spirit of the evening, including the Cupid Makes Me Retch with vodka, chocolate, espresso, beet, and rose water rinse, and the non-alcoholic Pickpocket, forged out of plum, Meyer lemon, thyme, citrus, and club soda. Guests scooped up cards with quotes about love in all its many forms as they nibbled on sexy bites from Landau and Jacoby, such as  smoked hearts of palm on crostini, jerk spiced carrots with rutabaga “fondue”, celery root “cacio e pepe” with fregola and black pepper, and crispy sunchokes with black garlic buffalo sauce and celery leaf ranch.


The festivities later moved upstairs, where DJ duo Maggs Bruchez raised the temperature in the room, laying down the PHL’s best beats. Chef Vernick and his team headed behind the burners for the second half of the subtly sultry evening, serving a trio of savory dishes featuring flavors designed to delight the senses, from salt cod and semolina croquettes with saffron cream and avocado crostini with spicy radish to tuna poke complemented by macadamia nuts and sweet soy and spicy veal meatballs swathed in ancho chili caramel served on appropriately dagger-like toothpicks.Continue Reading