Now Open: February Restaurant Week Reservations

February-RW-blogFebruary brings another month of dining for less in some of our favorite  destinations. Reservations fill up fast; consider yourselves warned!

* Hudson Restaurant Week has $13+ lunches and $25+ dinners through February 6. Reserve now.

* Napa Valley Restaurant Month invites you to sip, sup, and savor on $14-$30 lunches + $24-$50 dinners through February 28. Reserve now.

* Chicago Restaurant Week allows you to choose the finest of the Windy City with $22 lunches + $33/$44 dinners through February 12. Reserve now.

* Baltimore Restaurant Week serves up tasty three-course $15 lunches + $20 + $30 dinners, February 15-28. Reserve now.

* New York City Restaurant Week brings you the best of the boroughs with three-course $25 lunches + $38 dinners, February 16-March 6. Reserve now.

* 502 Restaurant Week comes to Louisville, Kentucky, with extra-special $50.20 dinners for one or two, February 18-March 4. Reserve now.

* Denver Restaurant Week wants to give your tastebuds a treat with $30 dinners at the Mile High City’s finest restaurants, February 20 to March 1. Reserve now.

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Come Join Us at OpenTable

At OpenTable, we power great dining experiences, but the best thing about OpenTable isn’t the places we are or the products we make; it’s the people who work here. And now, you can get to know them in our new video —  and discover why we think OpenTable is a truly special company.

There are many reasons the folks you’re about to meet love being at OpenTable every day: the opportunity to work in an organization that is equally passionate about both restaurants and technology; the satisfaction that comes with producing the tools restaurants need to provide diners with amazing hospitality experiences; and, of course, the chance to create and implement groundbreaking technologies.

Once you get here, you’ll see that we are passionate about all kinds of things, from amazing food and drink to personal pursuits that spill over into the professional. Yes, we really did have a Kentucky Derby race in the office. We really do have engineers who make mouthwatering waffles and build bespoke coffee bars — along with a CEO who really can catch flies with his bare hands. And, this really is a company that embraces you from the minute you walk in the door (and we’re not just talking about Alex!).

Watch for a look at our San Francisco headquarters, meet a few of our team members, and then apply to take a seat at our table. http://www.opentable.com/careers/

Stephanie Douglass is Senior Director, People + Culture, at OpenTable.

January Restaurant Weeks: New Year, New Ways to Save

LTPRGet ready for a month of nationwide deliciousness with restaurant weeks in more than 30 cities. Make a reservation to dine for less in January!

* Marin County Restaurant Month started on the first of the year! Enjoy happy hour specials and unique menus, January 1-31. Reserve now.

* Charleston Restaurant Week has kicked off. Dig into delish prix-fixe lunches + dinners, January 7-18. Reserve now.

* Sacramento Dine Downtown Restaurant Week offers up three-course $31 dinners, January 15-24. Reserve now.

* Restaurant Week South Carolina has what you crave with creative, prix-fixe three-course dinners, January 8-18. Reserve now.

Virginia Beach Restaurant Week serves up gourmet $10 lunches + $20 or $30 dinners, January 10-19. Reserve now.

* Galveston Restaurant Week has something for everyone with $10, $15, $20, $25, $30, $35, and $40 menus, January 10-24. Reserve now.

* Providence Restaurant Weeks brings you three-course $14.95 lunches and $29.95 + $34.95 dinners, January 11-24. Reserve now.

Restaurant Week Columbus has three-course meals for $15-$25, January 12-17. Reserve now.

* Pittsburgh Restaurant Week invites you to dine on specially priced three-course meals, January 12-18. Reserve now.

Sacramento Dine Downtown Restaurant Week beckons with three-course $31 dinners, January 15-24. Reserve now.

* Oakland Restaurant Week features oh-so-good $20, $30, and $40 lunches + dinners, January 15-25. Reserve now.

* Kansas City Restaurant Week presents $15 lunches and $33 dinners, January 16-25. Reserve now.

Dine Out Vancouver has mouthwatering $18, 28, and $38 dinners, January 16-February 1. Reserve now.

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Chef-Mom Suzette Gresham of Acquerello on Mothering Her Daughters + Her Staff

Suzette blogWe continue our conversations with some of the esteemed women featured in our Top 10 Mom-Owned Restaurants in America with Suzette Gresham. Chef Gresham is an owner of Acquerello, opened in 1989 and regarded as one of the finest Italian restaurants in San Francisco and the nation. She has established herself as one of the Bay Area’s most respected chefs and guided Acquerello to numerous accolades, including a 2013 Diners’ Choice Award for Top 100 Best Overall Restaurant in America. She is a proud mom to two daughters, Bibiana, 22, and Azaria, 18.

Twenty-five years ago you opened Acquerello. In that time, you became a mother and have successfully raised your kids and your restaurant into adulthood, yet you don’t dole out advice on this topic too often.

Passion makes up for a lot — lack of intelligence and lack of experience. If you are passionate about what you are doing, whether you are raising children or running a restaurant, you have a fighting chance. I think the main thing in life is just believing that you can do something and finding a way. Chefs are kind of like firemen and policemen. We rush right in. We do what we have to do, and we don’t think about ourselves. It’s that attitude of ‘I can do it, I can fix it, and I can save it.’ Maybe it is foolish on some level, but it is what you do and how you are as a person.

You didn’t necessarily set out to become a mother. That wasn’t on your must-do list, but you have two wonderful daughters.

No. I even went to a therapist when I found out I was having girls, and I said, “This is an error. This is a huge error. I can’t have girls. I must have boys.” He said, “Why?” I said, “I’m such a terrible role model for a girl. I’m working in a male-dominated field.” He said, “You are the perfect role model for girl.” It made me feel so much better. What he did was he gave me license. He gave me permission to just love my daughters the way that I want, the way that the world was, and the way that they were going to be in a less perfect state.

The one thing about chefs is we are forever seeking perfection, and we are our biggest and hardest critics. I had to learn: Don’t be judgmental. Don’t be so harsh. Let it go. That is one of the hardest things ever. Things will not be perfect. You will settle for a little bit less, but you will get further and probably do better in the long run. I know what maturity parenthood brings. Part of your soul opens up that isn’t maybe sincerely as accessible without kids. They make you humble.

Chefs work odd hours compared to the rest of the world, yet you’re able to be present when other parents are not. How did your daughters handle this, though, when they were little?

They realized later, but when they were younger, I had to sit down one Saturday when I was at my breaking point and explain. I said, “Do you realize what I do? Do you realize that I was chairman of the book fair? Do you realize that I am at your Girl Scout troop meetings? Do you realize I bake the cakes for your bake sales? Do you realize I bring all of the products whenever you have an event and you need food? Do you realize that I e-mail and talk to all of these parents and I’m involved in all of your educational aspects hands on? The only thing I can’t do is show up at six o’clock in the evening for a PTA meeting because I’m at work.”

In the early years of Acquerello, working moms were certainly common, but I would venture to guess your daughters were probably the only kids at school whose mom was a chef/restaurant owner.

Yes, they were the only ones, and there was not a lot of support in some respects. Some people understood, and some were very disapproving, quite honestly.

Really?

It was interesting, yeah, because I was outside the home in the evening when my children needed me, and that’s the way they thought.

Right, it’s like you’re in a circus or something. Continue Reading