November 2016 Restaurant Weeks: Save Before the Holidays

November 2016 Restaurant Weeks

Do the upcoming holidays have you on a tighter budget? Find out where to enjoy discounted and delicious meals in cities in North America this month!

* Long Island Restaurant Week features fabulous $27.95 dinners through November 6. Make a reservation.

* Hudson Valley Restaurant Week brings the best of the autumn harvest for less with $20.95 lunches + $29.95 dinners through November 13. Make a reservation.

* MTL à TABLE Montreal Restaurant Week invites you to take advantage of $21, $31, and $41 dinners, November 3-13. Make a reservation.

* Newport Restaurant Week comes to Boston soon. Don’t miss $16 lunches + $35 dinners, November 4-13. Make a reservation.

* Restaurant Week Wailea hits Hawaii this month. Book a table for $29, $39, and $49 dinners, November 6-12. Make a reservation.

* Dine Around Seattle returns with $22, $33, and $44 lunches + dinners, November 11-23. Make a reservation.Continue Reading

Spooky Sips: Halloween and Day of the Dead Cocktails

There is only one antidote for an overdose of Halloween candy and jack-o-lanterns — and that’s a drink or two. Tricks are for kids; treat yourself to one of these Halloween and Day of the Dead cocktails to get in the spirit of things.

Bleu Boheme, San Diego, California
Creatures of the night will be reaching for the new Sleepy Hollow cocktail just in time for Halloween. Made with mescal, allspice Dram liqueur, and an absinthe rinse, this creation is garnished with toasted rosemary. Wisps of smoke emanating from it resemble an eerie fog. Make a reservation at Bleu Boheme.

Halloween and Day of the Dead Cocktails

Dusk at the Ritz-Carlton, Naples, Florida
The Witches Brew is a rich concoction of Absolut Elyx, Cointreau, POM Blueberry juice, and a hint of sweet and sour. Some dry ice and a black sugar rim give this fruity cocktail a sinister look and feel to get you in the mood. Make a reservation at Dusk at the Ritz-Carlton.

Halloween and Day of the Dead Cocktails

Holsteins-The Cosmopolitan, Las Vegas, Nevada
Holsteins Shakes and Buns will offer the Graveyard Bam-BOOzled shake from through Halloween. This seasonal shake is created with vanilla ice cream and cherry vodka and is garnished with a graveyard made from Oreos, cherry sauce, a gummy skull, a mummy lollipop, a marshmallow Peep tombstone, bloody bones hard candy, and whipped cream finished with a candy corn-frosted rim. Get your drink and your candy fix all in one! Make a reservation at Holsteins-The Cosmopolitan.

Halloween and Day of the Dead Cocktails

Rosa Mexicano-Tribeca, New York, New York
To celebrate Halloween and Dia De Los Muertos, certified mezcalier Courtenay Greenleaf created the Rising of the Dead cocktail. It’s a spicy margarita with pineapple and basil, playfully garnished with two red chiles de arbol standing upright to resemble someone rising from the grave. Every sip is equal parts mysterious and spicy. Make a reservation at Rosa Mexicano.

Halloween and Day of the Dead Cocktails

Calavera, Oakland, California
At this Mexican restaurant in uptown Oakland, you’ll find the Ancient Corn Old Fashioned just in time for the Day of the Dead and Halloween. It combines Mezcal Vago ‘Elote’ harvest mezcal, bourbon, housemade pumpkin-spiced bitters, carved rock, and a homemade spiced caramel lollipop – the best flavors of fall in a single glass. Make a reservation at Calavera.

Halloween and Day of the Dead CocktailsContinue Reading

October 2016 Restaurant Weeks: Fall Into Delicious Savings

October 2016 Restaurant Weeks

Keeping it local or having an autumn travel adventure? Check out these steals on meals in cities in North America.

* Park City Dine About invites you to mine for terrific offers, including $10 + $15 lunches and $20 + $40 dinners through October 9. Make a reservation.

* Seattle Restaurant Week returns with two terrific weeks of $18 two-course lunches + $32 three-course dinners, October 9-13 and October 16-20. Make a reservation.

* Santa Cruz Restaurant Week comes ashore on October 12 with three-course $25 and $35 dinners through October 19. Make a reservation.

* Farm to Fork South Jersey Restaurant Week has freshly harvested deals with $25 + $35 dinners, October 16-21. Make a reservation.

Mpls.St.Paul Magazine Restaurant Week comes to the Twin Cities in a couple of weeks with $15 + $20 lunches and $25, $30 + $35 dinners, October 16-21. Make a reservation.

* Western New York Local Restaurant Week is your chance to support independent restaurants by taking advantage of $20.16, $30.16 + $40.16 lunches and dinners, October 17-23. Make a reservation.Continue Reading

Who Owns a Dish? A Discussion with Chef Stuart Lane of Spinasse

Who Owns a Dish? A Discussion with Chef Stuart Lane of Spinasse

On an episode of Chef’s Table, Netflix’s docuseries that follows prominent chefs, Grant Achatz recalls a discussion he had with chef Thomas Keller while he was a young cook at The French Laundry. Achatz had created a cantaloupe and caviar gelee dish for the restaurant’s tasting menu and chef Keller liked it and wanted to add it to the menu.

Before incorporating the dish into the menu Keller asked Achatz a question: “If this dish goes on the menu it becomes a French Laundry dish; are you okay with that?” Achatz said yes, as any young cook would, proud of creating something that his mentor deemed worthy enough of serving in his restaurant. The dish was added to The French Laundry’s tasting menu.

Every single restaurant dish starts as an idea from an executive chef or a line cook, who then works on creating that dish. In most kitchens, dishes don’t reach the menu until line cooks, sous chefs, or the executive chef taste the dish and add their opinions. It’s like editing a rough draft of an article. After everyone weighs in, the original chef or line cook that came up with dish makes changes based on the feedback and the process repeats itself. Once the dish is approved by all parties it’s added to the menu or run as a special for the night. That dish is the final draft, the one that gets published and added to the menu.

Except, in writing, finished articles usually include the name of the writer somewhere on the page. On menus, dishes are not credited to the cook who may have originally came up with the idea — instead they’re all lumped under the executive chef’s name. So, who really owns a dish? And in the case of signature dishes that become an important part of a tasting menu (a la Grant Achatz at The French Laundry) who can claim ownership?

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