Testing, Testing: Online Ordering Arrives in Select Cities

At OpenTable, we’re always searching for ways to connect you with great dining experiences. We recognize, however, that there are times when that great dining experience must come to you. Perhaps you can’t find a babysitter. Maybe sweat pants are the only item of clean clothing in your apartment. Or, more likely, Sharknado 3 is on and you just can’t pull yourself away. We get it.

For those times when you just can’t make it to a restaurant, OpenTable is here to help. In keeping with our tradition of investigating different ways to make your life delicious, online ordering is now being tested in select cities to save you from totally lame takeout or, even worse, frozen pizza. During this test period, diners in Chicago, Los Angeles, New York City, Philadelphia, and San Francisco can get connected to order delicious delivery or takeout from a restaurant’s profile page when you’re on OpenTable.com. There are more than 2,000 restaurants from which to choose.

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The next time you’re stuck on your sofa, let OpenTable help you connect with a delicious restaurant meal in the comfort of your home. Join us in this test and be sure to share your experiences with us at onlineordering@opentable.com. And, let us know what else we can do to make your life more delicious anytime.

Scott Jampol is Senior Vice President, Marketing, at OpenTable and a runner up in the 36th annual Sausalito Chili Cook-Off. 

Chill Out: Seven Cold Summer Soups to Order Now

Soup that isn’t served hot can be a real drag. Unless, of course, it’s cold soup, in which case it is a delightfully refreshing blast of flavor on a hot summer’s day. Here are seven cold summer soups to order now — and the restaurants at which to do so. 

Ajo Blanco
Sometimes referred to as “white gazpacho,” ajo blanco is a subtle Spanish summer delicacy made from ground almonds, garlic, bread, and olive oil for a smooth and cool texture on the tongue. A specialty of the Andalusian region of Spain, you’ll find it at your better tapas restaurants and Spanish wine bars. It is a real hit when it’s on the menu at at Jaleo by José Andrés in Washington, D.C. Give yourself extra points for consuming the superfood that is almonds. [Photo courtesy of Jaleo by José Andrés]

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Borsch
Borsch, or borscht, the storied beet soup of Eastern Europe can be served either hot or cold. A staple in New York’s Jewish community, it inspired the colloquial name of the old resort region in upstate New York: the “Borscht Belt.” But you don’t have to go to the Catskills to enjoy a good bowl of this purple pleasure. If you find yourself in San Francisco, schlep on over to the Inner Richmond district for a sanguine supper at Katia’s Russian Tea Room and Restaurant. Just be sure not to wear white unless your spooning skills are top notch. [Photo courtesy of Katia’s Russian Tea Room and Restaurant]

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Chilled Asparagus Soup
Cold soup, it turns out, can be made from just about any vegetable or fruit, offering a wide array of flavors and textures. Carrots lend their natural sweetness and pair well with fresh herbs, grated ginger, turmeric, and more subtle spices. Leeks bring fragrance to the bland creaminess of potatoes. Avocados, asparagus, fennel — all of these can take the main stage in a sublime cold soup when they are seasonably plentiful. These days, you’ll be able to find a great selection of freshly made soups made with everything from artichokes to zebra squash. At Pub & Kitchen in Philadelphia’s Center City, chef Eli Collins is dazzling diners with a lovely chilled asparagus soup featuring rhubarb, queso fresco, and almonds. [Photo courtesy of Pub & Kitchen]

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Korean Cold Noodle Soup
My completely unanticipated passion for cold soups began at a Korean-Chinese hole-in-the-wall somewhere in northern China where my host ordered us each a bowl of Korean Cold Noodle Soup (naengmyun). A full meal in itself, the large stainless steel bowl was filled with toothy noodles in an icy-cold, sweet, spicy, and tangy beef broth that I can still taste in my mind today. It was topped with an Asian pear, cucumbers, and more sliced beef. I’ve been chasing that dragon ever since. Stateside, Seorabol Korean Restaurant in Philadelphia makes their cold buckwheat noodles by hand in the traditional way. “This is the way Koreans have made and eaten naengmyun for centuries and we plan to keep that tradition and culture alive, even when it is not convenient,” says Seorabol’s chef Chris Cho. Seorabol offers two variations of the dish: bibim naengmyun (spicy mix), pictured, and mool naengmyun (in cold beef broth). Both are guaranteed to delight. [Photo courtesy of Seorabol]

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In Season: Spring Restaurant Weeks

spring restaurant weeksWe love everything about spring, from the first seasonal vegetables that grace our plates when we dine out to the warmer weather that means al fresco eating is in our future. On top of that, we’re looking forward to another round of restaurant weeks in cities across the country. Try a new restaurant, visit an old favorite — or both — during a restaurant week near you.

* Seattle Restaurant Week awaits with $15 lunches + $30 dinners, April 12-16 and April 19-23 (excluding April 18 + 19). Reserve now.

* Manayunk Restaurant Week has multi-course lunches + dinners for $35 and under, April 12-24. Reserve now.

* Jersey Shore Restaurant Week washes ashore with  $30.14 dinners, April 17-26. Reserve now.

* Buckhead Restaurant Week offers Atlanta diners delicious $25 + $35 dinners, April 18-26. Reserve now.

* Chicago Chef Week highlights the city’s best chef-driven restaurants with $22 lunches + $44 dinners, April 19-24. Reserve now.

* Walnut Creek Restaurant Week delights with $20 lunches and $30 + $40 dinners, April 19-26. Reserve now.Continue Reading

Culinary Couple Lee Chizmar + Erin Shea of Bolete Make the Most of Mondays

bolete photoWhen you blend two hospitality professionals with one successful restaurant and fold in two children, you’re not talking about a recipe that yields a ton of time for romance. Still, chef Lee Chizmar and general manager Erin Shea find ways to connect whenever they get the chance.

The owners of Bolete in Pennsylvania’s Lehigh Valley, Chizmar and Shea opened their restaurant in 2008 to a steady stream of accolades, and the acclaim has kept them busy ever since. Shea says, “Honestly with a restaurant and two kids under four, there isn’t a lot of room left for reconnecting. We have Mondays off together and try to make sure that we spend that as a family, leaving date nights to few and far between. Romantic for us is if I stay awake long enough to make a sandwich for my husband and share a bottle of wine.  Literally a turkey sandwich.  I know it isn’t glamourous, but it is life right now.”

Uncorking a bottle of wine — and arguing its merits — is a common way Chizmar and Shea sneak in quality couple time. “We will often open a great bottle of wine, even if it isn’t a special occasion. We actually have very different tastes in wine (he is a California boy and I love old world), so great debate and conversation often go into these late night wine dates.  And, really, us both being awake is the special occasion,” she says.

Before starting their family and opening the doors at Bolete, Chizmar and Shea, a couple for the last nine years, dined their way around the northeast. “When we were first together, all our free time was spent enjoying food and drink. In Boston, we would go out to eat every night after work. And, pre-kiddos, we spent a lot of time traveling to New York when the restaurant was closed.” Prune is a perennial favorite of the pair. “The food is so delicious and simple,” notes Shea. They also enjoy discovering different restaurants in Philadelphia. Chef Chizmar’s recent birthday was spent at Townsend. “The cocktail program there is a standout, and I highly recommend heading to their bar for a drink and a snack.”

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