Produce Playoff 2016 for No Kid Hungry: That’s a Wrap!

Produce Playoff 2016 for No Kid Hungry

This week, the culinary creatives at Betony partnered wth No Kid Hungry to hold the third annual Produce Playoff. After “drafting” their ingredients at the Union Square Greenmarket, some of the world’s finest chefs and beverage experts, including event founders Bryce Shuman and Eamon Rockey (Betony), Bo Bech (Geist), Daniel Burns (Luksus), Flynn McGarry (Eureka), Danielle-Innes (Cosme), Mina Pizzaro (Betony), Leo Robitshcek (The NoMad), Caleb Ganzer (Compagnie des Vins Surnaturels), and Dean Fuerth (Betony), gathered to craft dishes and drinks that showcased their picks in the most delicious ways. More than $75,000 was raised over the course of the evening.

If you missed it, photographer Simon Lewis was on hand to document the prep, the fun, the food, and the spirits. Check out the slideshow below.

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Oil Have What He’s Drinking: 10 Stunning Oil-Accented Cocktails

There’s an age-old scientific truism that oil and water don’t mix. The same is true of oil and liquor. But that hasn’t stopped crafty bartenders from figuring out creative ways to incorporate a colorful cornucopia of oils into their cocktails. From fat-washing liquors to flambéing citrus rinds and beyond, here are 10 stunning oil-accented cocktails.

The Blanchard, Chicago, Illinois
This is not your same-old-same-old Old Fashioned. Head barman Arunas Bruzas mixes Old Forester Special Reserve Bourbon, vanilla and lavender fume, and aromatic bitters. To complete the creation, he fires up an orange peel. This releases the rind’s zesty oils while reinforcing the bourbon’s smoky elements. Make a reservation at The Blanchard.

Oil-Accented Cocktails

Mourad, San Francisco, California
The Umami + Mint had us at umami (no offense, mint). White tequila is shaken with lemon juice, agave, ‘cumber rounds, mint leaves, and a touch of toasted sesame oil to add the “fifth taste.” It’s served in a double rocks glass with a bewitching ribbon of cucumber that’s sure to inspire you to shoot an Instagram before you take a sip. Make a reservation at Mourad.

Oil-Accented Cocktails

Tarallucci e Vino, New York, New York
The Caprese salad, now in cocktail form – minus the mozzarella. Head bartender Akram Bouchette muddles together cherry tomatoes, basil, simple syrup, and lemon juice before adding olive oil and grappa. Shaken with ice and strained, the pinkish potable comes garnished with cherry tomatoes and viridian basil leaves. Make a reservation at Tarallucci e Vino.

Oil-Accented Cocktails

Three Dots and a Dash, Chicago, Illinois
Beverage director Julian Cox gives a tiki twisted nod to the cult film Friday with his Aloha Felicia cocktail. It changes seasonally, but currently features rum, coconut cream, pineapple, lime, Thai basil, and lemongrass essential oil. The results mash together the sensibilities of the West Indies and the Far East. Make a reservation at Three Dots and a Dash.

Oil-Accented Cocktails

Il Porcellino, Chicago, Illinois
Screech would surely approve. The Saved by the Basil is a complex cocktail sporting Manzanilla fino sherry, lemon juice, Dimmi (an Italian aperitif infused with licorice, rhubarb, vanilla, ginseng, and more), strawberry, dehydrated orange, and a house-made cordial enriched with basil essential oil. Make a reservation at Il Porcellino.

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Produce Playoff Draft 2016: The Picks Are In!

Ahead of the third annual Produce Playoff to benefit No Kid Hungry at Betony on August 24, 2016, the players gathered in New York’s bustling Union Square Greenmarket to “draft” the stars of the dishes and drinks they’ll be creating next week. “Competing” chefs and beverage experts, including event founders Bryce Shuman and Eamon Rockey (Betony), Bo Bech (Geist), Daniel Burns (Luksus), Flynn McGarry (Eureka), Danielle-Innes (Cosme), Mina Pizzaro (Betony), Leo Robitshcek (The NoMad), Caleb Ganzer (Compagnie des Vins Surnaturels), and Dean Fuerth (Betony), spent the morning dashing around the market to stake their claim to the season’s best bounty in two lively rounds.

Catch the action with these shots from photographer Simon Lewis. Then, purchase your tickets to join us at the Produce Playoff on Wednesday to support No Kid Hungry in a most delicious way.

Produce Playoff Draft 2016
Let’s get it started in here.
Produce Playoff Draft 2016
Chef Bryce Shuman of Betony sounds the horn of Gondor.
Produce Playoff Draft 2016
Forget being true to your school; emcee Corey Warren of Betony is true to the #NoKidHungry cause.
Produce Playoff Draft 2016
“I’m sorry, but I don’t see your name on the list.”
Produce Playoff Draft 2016
Chef Flynn McGarry has a eureka moment when he spies ripe watermelon.
Produce Playoff Draft 2016
The future of the fight against childhood hunger is so bright, we’ve gotta wear shades.
Produce Playoff Draft 2016
2016 James Beard Rising Star Chef of the Year Daniela Soto-Innes channels her inner fashion blogger after selecting freshly harvested corn.
Produce Playoff Draft 2016
Pretty sure this is the prettiest draft board we’ve ever seen.
Produce Playoff Draft 2016
“I haz all the herbs.”
Produce Playoff Draft 2016
Open up and say … “Ahh!”
Produce Playoff Draft 2016
Flags were hoisted as the battle among the chefs for the best produce continued.
Produce Playoff Draft 2016
Despite going sleeveless, we’re pretty sure pastry chef Mina Pizarro of Betony has a special plan for this celery up her sleeve.
Produce Playoff Draft 2016
“No, seriously, I’m going to squash the competition.”
Produce Playoff Draft 2016
Which chef has her or his eyes on the prize of summer tomatoes?

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Edible Eureka: 4 Chefs Share the Meals That Changed Their Lives

Looking back over all the thousands of meals they’ve ever eaten, chefs can often pinpoint those that had the greatest impact. These epiphanic moments might inspire them to cook, profoundly alter their culinary philosophy, unveil a deeper revelation about the human experience, or instill a deep-seated love of a particular dish. Here 4 top chefs share the meals that changed their lives.

Cindy Wolf, Charleston, Baltimore, Maryland
“My dad was in the restaurant business, so I got to eat in a lot of fine dining restaurants growing up. In 1984 in Charleston, I dined with my parents at Morton’s in the Vendue Inn – no relation to the steakhouse – a 35-seat restaurant helmed by chef Marcelo Vasquez. I remember he personally prepared a number of dishes tableside: steak tartare, rack of lamb, and côte de boeuf with chimichurri, which no one was doing at the time. It was French-based cooking with Argentine influences. I was so excited after I ate there that I wanted to work with him. I went to culinary school in 1985 at the CIA and did my externship with Vasquez the next year. He became my mentor. He did one dish he called Shrimp Beaufort – named after a nearby town – made with sweet corn, green onions, lemon, butter, and salt. It was super simple. Local everything. It was so fresh. Simple, fresh, and local defined the rest of my career. He also taught me a deep respect for the product. One day, he bought a New York strip steak for us to have for dinner, which cost a lot of money and was a very extravagant thing to do at that time. I didn’t get it cooked in time for employee meal, so I cut them it into steaks and grilled them individually. I can still feel how disappointed he was in me. I’ll never forget that. But he instilled a real respect in me.” Make a reservation at Charleston.

Chefs Share the Meals That Changed Their Lives

Cathal Armstrong, Restaurant Eve, Alexandria, Virginia
“My dad was a tour operator in Ireland, so he sold airline tickets and hotel rooms as packages. His firm bought tickets in bulk and sometimes there would be a couple of seats left over. We’d be sitting around the dinner table and my dad would say, ‘Wanna go to Portugal tomorrow?’ He loved cooking, so food was always a part of our family and our trips. When I was six-years-old, we went to Alicanté in southeast Spain. One of dad’s travel agents took us up into the mountains to meet his grandmother. The men went out into the fields and caught rabbits, which they skinned alive. They dug a pit and hung the paella pan over it. It was incredible and made the longest lasting impact as a food memory. Since then, paella has been one of my favorite dishes to eat. However, my father prepared the best paella I’ve ever had in my life. Only about five years ago, I asked him to teach me the way to make it the way he does it. Similar to bouillabaisse or cassoulet, there are layers and layers of flavor in paella, which make a symphony. It’s everything food is supposed to be.” Make a reservation at Restaurant Eve.

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