Last-Minute Thanksgiving Reservations: Deals + Offers

Last-Minute Thanksgiving Reservations

ICYMI, Thanksgiving is just days away. If it slipped your mind (or your stomach), fear not. There is availability at top restaurants in cities all across the nation. To wit, we’ve rounded up a variety of deals and offers in our last-minute Thanksgiving reservations guide for restaurants in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Denver, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Seattle, and Washington, D.C. Read on and start booking!

A bit more: Le Bilboquet: With an all-day special menu, French favorite Le Bilboquet is open from 12PM-8PM and serving a 3-course meal at $65 per person and $25 for kids under 12.
A bit less: B’s Bistro: B’s is offering a traditional four-course turkey, ham or Scottish salmon Thanksgiving feast from 1PM-7PM. It’s just $34.95 plus tax and service, and $16.00 for the 12 and under crew.
A bit different: The SHED at Glenwood: Dig into an amazing Thanksgiving buffet with all the holiday classics! With seatings from noon to 7PM, it’s $50 for adults and $20 for kids 3-11.
Find more Thanksgiving restaurant reservations in Atlanta.

A bit more: Bar Boulud: Celebrate with friends and family while enjoying a three-course, prix-fixe Thanksgiving Day spread. Enjoy seasonal classics with a French twist, from 12PM-8PM for $85 apiece.
A bit less: Amuse: Chef Martin Quinn is creating a special three-course Thanksgiving prix-fixe menu for only $28 per person.
A bit different: Club Café: Do good while digging into the sumptuous buffet at Club Café. Served 11AM-4PM, it’s $29.95 per person and 10% of food sales will be donated to The Boston Living Center and the dollar donation will be matched by Mark West wines.
Find more Thanksgiving restaurant reservations in Boston.

A bit more: Cite: Feast with your family and friends on a hearty Thanksgiving brunch buffet on the 70th floor of the prestigious Lake Point Tower, from 10:30AM-2:30PM. Adults are $85 each, and kids eat for $38.
A bit less: Brasserie LM: Brasserie by LM will celebrate Thanksgiving with a $35 prix-fixe menu. Menu items include Roasted Chestnut Soup, Fried Ham Steak with bacon & Brussels sprout hash, and yummy Pumpkin Pie.
A bit different: Vermillion: Partake of the most unabashed innovative Thanksgiving feast that has earned raves from the Wall Street Journal, among others. The four-course global meal is big on herbs and spice with a Latin-Indian twist. Vegetarian options abound. $55 per person.
Find more Thanksgiving restaurant reservations in Chicago.

A bit more: Element 47: The three-course prix fixe Thanksgiving menu gets a luxe spin at Element. Book for the $99 per person experience with an optional $65 wine pairing.
A bit less: Hodson’s Bar and Grill-Southglenn: Enjoy a Thanksgiving dinner two ways — traditional with all the fixings for $17 or a smoked turkey with root vegetable gratin for $16. Both options are served all day, from 11AM-8PM.
A bit different: Kachina Southwestern Grill: Add a southwestern accent to your day with this family-style “Back to Our Roots” supper from 11AM-9PM. The four courses feature Achiote Turkey, Smoked Prime Rib, and traditional sides. $40 for adults and $15 for children.
Find more Thanksgiving restaurant reservations in the Denver area.

A bit more: Carbon Beach Club Restaurant at The Malibu Beach Inn: Surf into the holiday with a beachside Thanksgiving dinner. There are three courses for $ 85 per person with wine pairings available upon request.
A bit less: The Front Yard: You don’t have to stress about cooking this year if you hit up The Front Yard! Chef Chris is serving a save-ory menu at just $39 for adults and $18 kids 12 and under.
A bit different: The Hungry Cat: It’s tender vittles all the way with offerings that include deep-fried turkey, spiced cranberry, chorizo and oyster stuffing, potato puree and more, plus dessert.
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Michelin Guide New York City 2016 Restaurants: An Inside Look

The Michelin Guide New York City is celebrating its first decade in the Big Apple, having recently anointed the city’s best restaurants from a city with among the richest selection in the country. We’re pleased to highlight the Michelin Guide New York City 2016 restaurants and provide an inside look at how the stars awarded.

Michelin Guide NYC 2016 Winners

Michelin’s top secret elite team of professional inspectors have been swarming the city over the past year, literally dining out twice a day, every day, evaluating and re-evaluating well over a thousand of the city’s eateries to tasting their way to the finest. It’s an enviable job, but a grueling one. The inspectors consider a broad array of criteria to sift out the very best. This year, out of hundreds considered, a mere 76 got stars.

Receiving just one of these coveted stars is a considered a huge honor and is often a career-changing affirmation of a chef’s (and his kitchen’s) talent. The dark side is the incredible pressure to maintain that standard since Michelin continually checks in (always anonymously) to ensure things are up to snuff.

Alas, the lion’s share of the attention invariably gets showered on the perennial (albeit deserving) winners that garner the pinnacle of three-stars: Eleven Madison Park, Per Se, Masa. Without a doubt, each offers breathtaking culinary delights. But their experience is more akin to a seismic event than an ordinary meal. For mere mortals, though, just scoring a table at most of them can require months of waiting. The typically epic tasting menus can be multi-hour endurance challenges that culminate with a bill that may rival your mortgage payment. They are memorable extravaganzas perfect special events and life milestones but probably not a weekly ritual for most of us.

Hidden in plain view, though, are some lesser-known finds among New York City’s 60-odd one-star winners. Despite the coveted endorsement of Michelin, many of these places are neighborhood treasures sometimes better known to well-prepared European tourists brandishing their telltale Red Michelin guides than to local New Yorkers. Get in while you can. These spots are home to some of the city’s very best meals and their secret won’t last forever.

Here are a few of our favorites…

The Musket Room
Self-trained Kiwi chef Matt Lambert first solo effort caught the eye of the Michelin crew mere weeks after opening and, in a rare feat, earned its first star just a few months later. A celebration of the ingredients and cuisine of his native New Zealand, Lambert’s kitchen is constantly innovating but always seeming to hit the mark. The understated, stark dining room is the ideal canvas to show off his gorgeously painterly dishes. The menu now includes a nine-course chef’s tasting, but the a la carte is hard to beat. The signature Red Deer flavored with deconstructed essence of gin is a sophisticated and nuanced combination of flavors that never gets tired.

2016 Michelin NYC Winners

The Finch
Another rookie, Gabe McMackin, quietly launched Finch Clinton Hill’s The Finch less than a year ago, but the intrepid Michelin crew discovered his bold-flavored approach to farm-to-table soon after. Much to the chef’s surprise and delight – they were soon awarded their first star. McMackin’s conceptual menu can seem deceptively simple, but his tiny (I mean tiny) kitchen packs tremendous skill executing each dish beautifully. His much discussed, but not to be missed, $8 bread plate is a restrained showcase for exceptional, local ingredients to shine including some of the best butter you may ever have the privilege of eating.

Michelin Guide NYC 2016 Winners

Polo Dobkin, who earned his first Michelin nod at the now defunct Dressler is now on his own and better than ever. His delicate pastas and earthy mains (try the duck with black mission fig) prove the first round of kudos were no fluke. The unrecognizably transformed space is a lighter, more inviting home to kick back and savor the kitchen’s prowess.

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Dine Out for Heroes: Farmer Dave Beardi on How Your Support Can Help Change the Life of an Injured Veteran

This month, from November 9-13th, you’re invited to Dine Out for Heroes at a participating restaurant in New York City. In support of The Bob Woodruff Foundation, a national nonprofit dedicated to ensuring that post-9/11 injured service members, veterans, and their families thrive long after they return home, restaurants that were moved to participate gave a contribution to the foundation.

To illustrate how every dollar raised can help an injured veteran on the road to recovery and leading a fulfilling life, we chatted with farmer and U.S. Army veteran David Beardi of BRD’s Forever Farm in Dayton, New York. Beardi was injured in his service to our nation. During his recovery, he connected with a fellow vet and farmer named John Post. Beardi says, “He had a small farm and he used to just pick me up and take me there. And I found it was transformative working with the animals. It really changed my life dramatically. If you would have told me that working with animals was therapeutic, previously, I would have been a little skeptical. But it was just transformative.”

Blog D. Beardi tractor 2 copy

That healing work ignited a passion for farming, and soon, Beardi and his family purchased a defunct dairy farm previously owned by an Amish family. It was, in Beardi’s own words, “a massive undertaking.” The farm was in serious disrepair and in need of many improvements, including bringing in plumbing and electricity, all of which Beardi tackled.

But, even the hardest working farmer can use a helping hand – or a tractor – and the Bob Woodruff Foundation stepped up. Through Michael O’Gorman, Executive Director of the Farmer Veteran Coalition and the Farmer Veteran Fellowship Fund, Beardi was awarded a Bob Woodruff Farming Fellowship. This allowed him to buy a tractor and install much-needed electric fencing for his cattle. “Michael O’Gorman is a terrific human being. I can’t say enough about him. I don’t think we would have achieved the growth we’ve had without this. It was pretty critical for us to get going. And I use that tractor every single day,” he notes.

Today, BRD’s Forever Farm produces naturally and humanely raised meats, including Angus beef and heritage pork, which are highly sought after by western New York locavores. On the 116-acre property, Beardi, his wife Becky, and their children have a herd of 50 cows and 100 pasture-raised pigs that graze on pastures of alfalfa and red and white clover. The animals enjoy the lush property and are treated with the utmost care and respect. “We’ve created a very low-stress environment for the animals, from how they live to how we handle them. We take great pride in how we care for them,” says Beardi. “People come to the farm all the time. It really is a pretty fantastic place.”Continue Reading

Enjoying Your Party of One: 7 More Standout Spots for Solo Dining

Dining alone does not have to be a harried, self-conscious affair. These days, people dine alone for all sorts of good reasons. One of the best is the opportunity to eat at your own pace and fully take in the experience of the food and atmosphere around you. And while I often enjoy a seat at the bar, there is no reason not to ask for a table where one can have a more intimate experience.

If you find yourself too embarrassed to dine alone, don’t be. As evidenced by OpenTable’s list of 25 top spots for solo diners in America, there are restaurants that are adept at creating a delicious meal just for you. So skip the bad takeout in your apartment and the lukewarm hotel room service. There are thousands of restaurants on OpenTable that are quite happy to reserve your table for one. Below are seven more standout spots for solo dining.

Barking Crab, Boston, Massachusetts
The Barking Crab is a South Boston landmark and one of my favorite summer hotspots. For 21 years, they’ve been serving up New England seafood and microbrews in a casual clam shack setting that makes me yearn for summer all year round. From crabs and lobsters to fresh fish brought in from the docks each day, this is a place to bucket up and chow down. The lively communal seating makes it easy to feel like you’re part of the crowd without feeling conspicuous.

Solo Dining Barking Crab

Cipriani Dolci-Grand Central Terminal, New York, New York
There’s seemingly no end to the number of great destinations for solitary food and entertainment in New York. But, for me, one stands out among the others for its superb location and life-affirming people watching. Dining beneath the star-speckled ceiling of the Grand Central Terminal offers no end of fascination as you watch one of the most spectacular acts of daily human migration unfold before you. Nestled in an upper corner on the main concourse of Grand Central Station, Cipriani Dolci offers refreshing cocktails, eye-boggling appetizers (try the Prosciutto Crudo di Parma), and a birds-eye view of pure unbridled humanity. You will witness loves both found and lost, trains both caught and missed. You will make groundless assumptions about the lives, personalities, and aspirations of all before you. And you will leave feeling like the great American bluesman Taj Mahal — “satisfied and tickled, too.”

Solo Dining Cipriani Dolci

Cork, Washington, D.C.
With more than 50 wines by the glass, the D.C. wine bar Cork is a fine place to break bread and pay your respect to Dionysus, god of the grape harvest, in simple solitude. Sure, they have dishes to share, but no one says you have to! Prices at Cork are very reasonable, too, with plenty of small plates, cheeses, and charcuterie, and most hot offerings coming in at under $20. Food and wine pairings and wine flights just might make this casual Logan Circle joint your new local.

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