Top Chef Just Desserts Season 2 Episode 7: Doughnuts + Double Eliminations

The yeasty doughnuts Carlos made are pretty cool...

Episode 7 of Top Chef Just Desserts season 2 touched on at least one subject very near and dear to my heart — doughnuts! Le Bernardin‘s Executive Pastry Chef Michael Laiskonis is back to discuss doughy treats and chocolate showpieces!

I play in a band called Hot Doughnuts (founded many years before they became trendy), named because we thought that there are few people who do not like a hot doughnut. That said, I fear the trendiness of the simple and humble doughnut (see cakes, cup). Any thoughts on that?

Wow, a band? I never realized you were so multi-talented, Caroline! (Ed. note: Ha! Hardly!) Because fried dough is so ubiquitous — it seems every culture on the planet has some version of its own — it’s almost trend-proof. I guess the only risk factor would be the inevitable poor execution that comes with more folks jumping on that bandwagon. I have to say I am a fan of NYC’s Doughnut Plant; the tres leches creation is that good.

I’ll have to break down and try one of the DP’s doughnuts then. Also, our band is only slightly worse than Crucifictorious. So, create the perfect doughnut! That’s a tall order! My idea of it is a very simple, painfully plain doughnut. I love a classic plain for dunking (note: not ‘Dunkin’!) or a classic light and fluffy glazed. Oh, and an old-school jelly doughnut. What are some of your ideas around perfect doughnuts?

..but maybe not as cool as my band's logo?

Yeah, for the most part, I’m pretty old-school when it comes to doughnuts. Just as we tend to judge pizza on its crust, the fundamental aspect of the doughnut should be the dough itself. If I had one item that came close to Proust’s memory-inducing madeleine, it would be warm cinnamon doughnuts and apple cider, which takes me back to autumns of childhood, visiting the local cider mill in Michigan. And I’ve never really looked into the process that makes a classic Krispy Kreme  so good — maybe that they glaze while still warm — but I always say that one isn’t enough, but two is too many. In a good way!

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