Foodspotting: Does Foodie Photography Make You Lose Your Appetite?

The Getty Museum in Los Angeles has kicked off its new (pre-digital) food photography exhibit called “In Focus: Tasteful Pictures” around the same time that everyone is talking about the rise of diners obsessively photographing their food; some are even videotaping their dining experiences. Chefs, beyond Grant Achatz, and including Ludo Lefebvre, are getting upset that food isn’t being enjoyed at the proper temperature — and that the photography is slowing down service.

Do you photograph your food when dining out? Are you irritated when others do so? Is videography taking the documentary portion of dining out too far? Tell us what you think here or on Facebook.

How to Take Foodspotting Photos (Unless You’re at Alinea)

PaprikaFrom the “Not-Exactly-Breaking-News” files, food photography is rampant at restaurants, thanks to, first, Flickr, then Twitpic, and now Foodspotting. The act of creating food porn, as a lot of people call it, while eating out has become more acceptable, even though it annoys some diners. I admit I’ve done this a few times — but very surreptitiously and only to let a friend see what she’s missing. Cruel, I know.

The New York Times details the rise of food photography’s popularity and also provides a practical guide from blogger Andrew Scrivani to taking the best food photos on the fly. If you don’t want to offend your fellow diners, at Bon Appetit, BA Foodist Andrew Knowlton list three simple rules for taking food pics on the sly. Whatever you do regarding foodie photography, don’t do it at Alinea, lest you incur the wrath of the great Grant Achatz.