National Fried Chicken Day: Tasty Takes on an American Favorite

Hamburgers, shmamburgers. We’re saying it: Fried chicken is now our national dish! From its humble origins in Scotland, where, according to the book Advances in Deep-Fat Frying of Foods, edited by Servet Gulum Sumnu and Serpil Sahin, the Scots prepared chicken fried without the spices we’ve come to associate with it today, to its evolution at the hands of African slaves who added in savory seasonings, it has been enjoying a renaissance in restaurants around the nation for the past several years.

As far back as 1938 (and even farther we’d venture to say), The New York Times was documenting the kerfuffle over the proper way to make fried chicken, debating the virtues of bona fide Southern fried chicken over that of recipes created by cooks in the north. Now this is not to say that we’re not interested in the authenticity of recipes, but what matters most to us is flavor. And flavor comes in many forms, from preparations classic and close to home to those exotic and international. In that spirit, then, and in honor of National Fried Chicken Day, we’ve rounded up tasty takes on an American favorite, featuring influences near and far.

Fried Chicken Basket, Blue Smoke, New York, New York
Inspired by his childhood in Louisiana, executive chef Jean-Paul Bourgeois added his own extra-crispy fried chicken recipe to the menu when he joined the restaurant in 2014. To achieve maximum crispiness, he employs a special “double dunk” process. Available mild or coated with spicy honey, each order comes with hot, buttery, house-baked biscuits glazed with a touch of honey and topped with flakes of salt and is served with a vessel of Steen’s cane syrup, a Louisiana product rarely seen this far north. [Photo credit: Melissa Horn]

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Thursday’s Southern Fried Chicken, BOA Steakhouse, Santa Monica, California
Executive chef Jose Melendez recently revamped the sexy steakhouse’s lunch menu to include a number of new daily specials, including Thursday’s Southern Fried Chicken. Tear into three pieces of white and dark meat along with must-have sides of coleslaw, potato salad, and spicy hot sauce – and make Friday jealous.

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Lou Dogg’s Crispy Skin Chicken, E.P. + L.P., West Hollywood, California
At this newly opened, multi-level modern Asian eatery in the city of angels, guests can dig in to chef Louis Tikaram’s “Lou Dogg’s Crispy Skin Chicken” – half a Mary’s Farm chicken with black vinegar, chili, and lemon. Australia’s 2014 Josephine Pignolet Young Chef of the Year, Tikaram — and his delicious take on fried chicken — will have you begging for more!

Blog E.P._Lou Dogg's Crispy Skin Chicken1 copyContinue Reading

10 Things You Need to Know About Top Chef Seattle Episode 12

Despite growing up in a non-fried chicken household, Lizzie manages to make one of the better dishes in the Elimination Challenge.

The world has been righted — at least in one way. But, outside of that, we all observed how hard it is to make good fried chicken. That’s not entirely true, actually. Maybe if more of the cheftestants had actually attempted to make traditional fried chicken instead of, say, chicken cordon bleu? Anyway, here are some pertinent points. Spoilers ahead.

1. Josie’s response to Kristen’s leaving: “I feel heavy this morning.”

2. Mr. Katsuya Uechi (Katsuya) says, “Always think, ‘How do you make people who eat happy?'” I’m guessing by feeding them, but what do I know?

3. Just because Sheldon cooks Asian food does not mean he makes sushi. Jeez!

4. Josie says she throws sushi parties in which sushi is served on naked women. This does not sound at all sanitary.Continue Reading

Restaurant News Roundup: Rules for the Perfect Restaurant; Morton’s Draws in Diners; Barbara Lynch’s Menton Nears Opening, and More

What people are talking about when they talk about restaurants this week…

* Critic AA Gill reveals his version of the golden rules for a perfect restaurant — sort of. [London Times]

* Morton’s thrives, proving that people are still eating plenty of red meat. [Wall Street Journal]

* Having a power lunch in London? Find out where you should dine. [Business Insider]

* Maggiano’s has great discounts on dinner for two. [Nation’s Restaurant News]

* Wimbledon is getting an ace of a chef for this year’s The Gatsby Club, who promises to be worthy of Roger Federer. [Event]

* One-time Rat Pack hangout Da Vinci in Los Angeles is back in business, with a facelift and a new face in the kitchen. [Eater LA]

* Everything old is new again at AltaMare in Miami. [Eater Miami]

* Check out Marcony in Manhattan’s Murray Hill. [Grub Street New York]

* Rialto in Boston adds a patio and a new sous chef, Brian Rae. [Grub Street Boston]

* La Grenouille‘s Charles Masson speaks about his restaurant’s famous floral arrangements, his favorite kind of diners, and more. [WWD]

* Congratulations to Tom Colicchio and the staff at Colicchio & Sons for their three-starred review from Sam Sifton. [The New York Times]

* Find out the secret ingredient in Blue Hill‘s fried chicken. [Saveur]

* Turner Fisheries in Boston is adding lunch. [Grub Street Boston]

* Eagerly anticipated and soon-to-open Menton, the latest in Barbara Lynch’s Boston restaurant empire, is accepting reservations. [Grub Street Boston]

* New York restaurants must display their cleanliness grades, and not everyone is happy about it. [The New York Times]