1st Annual Cherry Bombe Jubilee + After-Party

On Sunday, March 30th, in Manhattan, Cherry Bombe magazine’s Kerry Diamond and Claudia Wu hosted the first Cherry Bombe Jubilee, a conference in celebration of women in the world of food. Sponsored in part by OpenTable and attended by hundreds of up and comers and established names (Hello, Alice Waters!)  in the culinary realm, it was a day of learning, discussion, networking, and, of course, food. Later that evening, OpenTable hosted an after-party at Corkbuzz Wine Studio. Featuring wines curated by owner Laura Maniec, Jordan Salacityo, Beverage Director at Momofuku restaurants, Pascaline Lepeltier, Wine Director at Rouge Tomate, and Juliette Pope, Wine Director at Gramercy Tavern, the after party also featured sweet and savory treats. You can check out exclusive photos from the evening’s festivities below.

Throughout the Jubilee, some of the food world’s best and brightest weighed in on a number of topics, including:

* Christina Tosi of Momofuku Milk Bar (and inventor of the famed crack pie), spoke about being the change. “We get to choose how we exist in this industry.” She urged attendees, “Be the individual. Individuality is priceless.” She also encouraged women to “make room for someone else to come in” to your kitchen, your business, and the industry.

* Dorothy Cann Hamilton, founder of the French Culinary Institute (my alma mater!), pointed out that although there’s a perception that there are more men in the culinary field, the percentage of women attending culinary school was 59% in 2012 (up from 31% in 1992) as compared to just 41% male students. Her hypothesis as to why we aren’t seeing more female chefs dominating restaurant kitchens is that women are seeking out more entrepreneurial ventures after graduating.

* Chefs April Bloomfield (The Spotted Pig), Katie Button (Cúrate), Anita Lo (Annisa), and Sarah Kramer were on a panel called “Getting Your Clog in the Door.” They all agreed that doing a stage/internship is an important first step. Kramer said, “Doing a stage is a great way to get your foot in the door at a restaurant if you want to work there.” And, it worked for Kramer; she wound up staging and, later, working at Blue Hill at Stone Barns. Beyond a stage, Lo advised, “Go work at the best restaurant you can find.” She started her career at Bouley and hasn’t missed a beat since. For those newbies not living in a major culinary city, there are still plenty of opportunities. Bloomfield pointed out, “No matter where you start, it will expose you and lead you to other places.” For those unable to get into the kitchen of their dreams, Button recommends starting in the front of the house to get to the back of the house. She employed that strategy successfully at both El Bulli and José Andrés’s restaurants.Continue Reading

Jay Poblador Invites You to ‘A Night Out for the Philippines’ in NYC on 1/27 to Build a Village


On November 8, 2013, Typhoon Haiyan devastated large swaths of the Philippines, killing more than 6,100 people and destroying the industries that are vital to villages. The destruction hit very close to home for many people with family in the Philippines, including Jay Poblador, general manager at The Elm in New York. Seeking a way to aid in recovery efforts, Jay founded NYers for the Philippines. His co-founder is Arnold Marcella, who is a sous chef at The Elm.

On January 27, 2014, NYers for the Philippines invites you to join New York City’s most notable chefs, mixologists, and entertainers at A Night Out for the Philippines: Building A Village Together at Bagatelle New York. All proceeds from this one-night-only fundraiser will provide housing and create a sustainable rehabilitation program for a community in the Philippines hard-hit by Typhoon Haiyan.

Jay reveals, “When the typhoon hit the Philippines, Arnie Marcella  and I were struck by the intensity of the storm and the amount of damage it had brought on so many regions in the Philippines. As we tried to contact relatives to make sure that everyone was safe and accounted for, we realized that we both had ties to Iloilo City.” After Jay and Arnie learned that most of the aid was being focused on Tacloban City, the epicenter of the typhoon’s damage, they were spurred to form the group NYers for the Philippines to raise funds for Iloilo’s recovery.

NYers for the Philippines has partnered with Gawad Kalinga, whose mission in the Philippines is to restore human dignity, first to impoverished communities in the Philippines, and then, because of all the natural calamities the country has faced, assist communities devastated by these acts. At a base level, providing a safe permanent environment for individuals and families is the first order of business. Jay and his team hope to raise enough money to rebuild an entire village of 25 to 30 homes. He notes, “In appreciation of all the chefs who are participating in A Night Out for the Philippines: Building A Village Together, we intend to put plaques on the homes commemorating their generosity. One of the things we get to do in this partnership is to name the village. For example, there is a Lufthansa Village, a Mandarin Oriental Village, and so on.” He adds with a smile, “Ours may very well be named Chefs’ Village.” Jay and members of NYers for the Philippines plan to visit the village when the houses are complete and meet the people living there. Continue Reading

Restaurant News Roundup: Rules for the Perfect Restaurant; Morton’s Draws in Diners; Barbara Lynch’s Menton Nears Opening, and More

What people are talking about when they talk about restaurants this week…

* Critic AA Gill reveals his version of the golden rules for a perfect restaurant — sort of. [London Times]

* Morton’s thrives, proving that people are still eating plenty of red meat. [Wall Street Journal]

* Having a power lunch in London? Find out where you should dine. [Business Insider]

* Maggiano’s has great discounts on dinner for two. [Nation’s Restaurant News]

* Wimbledon is getting an ace of a chef for this year’s The Gatsby Club, who promises to be worthy of Roger Federer. [Event]

* One-time Rat Pack hangout Da Vinci in Los Angeles is back in business, with a facelift and a new face in the kitchen. [Eater LA]

* Everything old is new again at AltaMare in Miami. [Eater Miami]

* Check out Marcony in Manhattan’s Murray Hill. [Grub Street New York]

* Rialto in Boston adds a patio and a new sous chef, Brian Rae. [Grub Street Boston]

* La Grenouille‘s Charles Masson speaks about his restaurant’s famous floral arrangements, his favorite kind of diners, and more. [WWD]

* Congratulations to Tom Colicchio and the staff at Colicchio & Sons for their three-starred review from Sam Sifton. [The New York Times]

* Find out the secret ingredient in Blue Hill‘s fried chicken. [Saveur]

* Turner Fisheries in Boston is adding lunch. [Grub Street Boston]

* Eagerly anticipated and soon-to-open Menton, the latest in Barbara Lynch’s Boston restaurant empire, is accepting reservations. [Grub Street Boston]

* New York restaurants must display their cleanliness grades, and not everyone is happy about it. [The New York Times]