Food & Wine’s Best New Chefs 2015: Book a Table

Food & Wine magazine recently announced its annual roster of Best New Chefs of 2015. The honorees represent chefs who have been running a kitchen for less than five years and who are winning fans and attention in their culinary communities. A few commonalities among the winners, according to Food & Wine Editor in Chief Dana Cowin, include nods to the past and a highly personal aspect to their cooking. “The chefs seem to be cooking to please themselves, and in the process have dazzled diners,” Cowin told CNN. The standout chefs include:

Chef Zoi Antonitsas, Westward, Seattle, Washington

Résumé: Chef Antonitsas may be familiar to diners outside the Seattle area because of her turn as a cheftestant on season 4 of Top Chef. Formerly the executive chef at Madison Park Conservatory in Seattle, Antonitsas worked at  Zazu Kitchen + Farm in Sebastapol, and the Presidio Social Club in San Francisco before opening Westward in the fall of 2013 and bringing her unique blend of Mediterranean-meets-Pacific Northwest cuisine to the shores of Lake Union. She also served as a consultant for nopa.
Rave review for her food: “The food — ah! The food was amazing! I loved that everything was so simple, yet so delicious — how food should be. The presentation was impeccable.”
Book a table!

PFE - chef katie button panuelo de chocolate - 5.2011Chef Katie Button, Cúrate, Asheville, North Carolina

Résumé: Scientist-cum-chef Button opened Cúrate in 2011 after mastering her culinary craft at Spain’s legendary El Bulli. Later stints include Jean-Georges in New York and The Bazaar by José Andrés in Beverly Hills. She also opened the bar Nightbell, and is penning her first cookbook. Cúrate has been named a Top 100 Best Restaurant in America in 2013 and a Top 100 Fit for Foodies Restaurant in 2014 by OpenTable diners.
Rave review for her food: “The quality of the food was outstanding. I have been to Spain multiple times and this was like being there, from the food to the wine to the unhurried pace of the meal.”
Reserve a table!

Chef Jim Christiansen, Heyday, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Résumé: His experience may be primarily rooted in the midwest, but chef Christiansen found his inspiration abroad as well, namely in the cuisine of Copenhagen’s renowned noma, at which he staged. After spending time in the kitchens of La Belle Vie and UNION Rooftop Restaurant in the Twin Cities, Christiansen opened Heyday to acclaim in April 2014.
Rave review for his food: “The kitchen obviously knows their stuff and the chef is inspired from start to finish. With baked goods done in house, everything is super fresh and innovative without being inaccessible. We were so happy with our food and our server; it couldn’t have been better.”
Reserve a table!

Chef Tim Maslow, Ribelle, Boston, Massachusetts

Résumé: Chef Maslow is well known to Boston foodies, having first wowed diners when he revamped the menu at his father Paul’s aging Watertown restaurant Strip-T’s. Previously, he honed his skills within the Momofuku family of restaurants in Manhattan, rising to chef de cuisine of Momofuku Ssam Bar. He opened Ribelle in March of 2013 and received four stars from the Boston Globe a little more than half a year later.
Rave review for his food: “Whenever I get a chance to stop by Ribelle, I again realize that Tim is at the very top of the list of the best chefs in the Boston area. As a foodie, I love this place.”
Reserve a table!Continue Reading

Kentucky Derby Dining; El Bulli Exhibit; Hottest Celeb Chefs; Farina Interview + More News

About 120,000 mint juleps are expected to be served at the Kentucky Derby this weekend.

Food and dining news from around the web and the world…

* Heading to Churchill Downs? Here are some Kentucky Derby dining recommendations. []

* Simply the best. What makes a restaurant the best isn’t a critic’s opinion so much as your own. [Telegraph]

* Never dined at El Bulli? You can still (sort of) experience it, thanks to a new exhibit in London this summer. [ABC News]

* Some like it hot. A round-up attractive celebrity chefs. [E! Online]

* California foie gras kerfuffle. This time, it’s personal. [Daily Pilot]

* Shop talk. Top Chef alum Richard Farina of moto chats with boss Homaro Cantu. [HuffPostContinue Reading

Fun Dining vs. Fine Dining; Restaurant in Spain Shutters, Thousands Mourn; An Ode to Outdoor Dining; Celeb-Owned Restaurants; Stopping Table Squatting

Amateur Gourmet Adam Roberts enjoys a post-meal stroll with partner Craig Johnson.

* Fun dining is the new fine dining. To steal a line from Trading Places, can’t we have both? [GrubStreet NY]

* Some restaurant in Spain closed. People are upset. [The Guardian]

* 10 signs that the next sign you’ll see on your fave restaurant will be “Going Out of Business.” []

* Unhappy campers. Lingering, or squatting, at a table for too long in a crowded restaurant creates a sticky situation for everyone. [CHOW]

* Stars! They’re just like us! They own restaurants. Well, not like me. I don’t own any restaurants and I don’t think anyone else at OpenTable does. [MSNBC]

* Even when no one really knows they do. [TODAY]

* Speaking of stars, this celebrity-magnet restaurant has merited its very own blind item. Guess away. [BlindGossip]

* The City of Angels transports blogger to the city of elves. Amateur Gourmet (and future Angeleno) Adam Roberts waxes poetic on the joys of dining al fresco in LA. [Epicurious]

* Can a chef get — and stay — slim? And, if so, is she a hypocrite for serving up fatty foods? [Salon]

* Does a food porn party lead to a food orgy? The author doesn’t say. [The Awl]

Continue Reading