The Best Kid-Friendly Restaurants in Top Summer Travel Destinations in America 2016

As families hit the road and take to the skies on summer travels, we are pleased to unveil the Best Kid-Friendly Restaurants in Top Summer Travel Destinations in America.

Featuring restaurants beloved by locals and visitors alike, the complete list highlights restaurants in Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco, Seattle, and Washington, D.C., including Little Goat in Chicago, M Street Kitchen in Santa Monica, and Le Diplomate in Washington, D.C. A to-dine list for families who love to explore the cities they visit through restaurants, this collection of eateries represents those that provide a welcoming atmosphere for children and their families in addition to food that pleases all palates. A multitude of cuisines are represented on the lists, including barbecue, Brazilian, dim sum, French, Japanese, seafood, and, naturally, perennial family favorite, Italian.

 

The Best Kid-Friendly Restaurants in Top Summer Travel Destinations in America 2016 list is generated from more than 1.4 million restaurant reviews submitted by verified OpenTable diners between June 1, 2015, and May 31, 2016. All restaurants with a minimum “overall” score and number of qualifying reviews were included for consideration. Qualifying restaurants were then sorted according to a score calculated from each restaurant’s average rating in the “kid friendly” category. Based on this methodology, the following restaurants, listed in alphabetical order, comprise the Best Kid-Friendly Restaurants in Top Summer Travel Destinations in America 2016, according to OpenTable diners. The complete list may also be viewed at http://www.opentable.com/m/best-kid-friendly-restaurants/.

CHICAGO
Chicago q
Dinosaur Bar-B-Que
Fogo de Chao Brazilian Steakhouse
Little Goat
Maggiano’s
Mon Ami Gabi
Quartino
RJ Grunt’s
Stella Barra Pizzeria
Weber Grill
Wildfire

LOS ANGELES
BenihanaEncino, Ontario, Puente Hills, Santa Anita, Torrance
Black Angus Steakhouse-Torrance
Buca di Beppo-Claremont
Duke’s Malibu
Enterprise Fish Co.-Santa Monica
Farmshop LA
Gus’s BBQ
M Street Kitchen
Maggiano’sFarmers Market + Woodland Hills
North Italia-El Segundo
Paradise Cove Beach Café
Queen Mary Champagne Sunday Brunch

NEW YORK
Blue Smoke
Carmine’s44th Street + 91st Street
Dinosaur Bar-B-Que-Harlem
Landmarc at the Time Warner Center
Max Brenner-Union Square
NINJA NEW YORK
The Palm Court at The Plaza Hotel
Rock Center Café
Sarabeth’s TriBeCa
Sugar Factory-Meatpacking District
Tony Di NapoliMidtown + UES
Virgil’s Real BBQContinue Reading

11 Epic Steaks Worthy of the World’s Greatest Fathers

June holds two events that are near and dear to our hearts — National Steakhouse Month and Father’s Day. Coincidence? We think not. So, this Father’s Day, ditch the boring ties and cufflinks and the cheesy #1 Dad coffee mug in favor of a memorable steak dinner, which is a win-win for you. Especially if you order bigger-than-big cuts, which are sure to impress upon your pa just how much you love, respect, and admire him. Here are 11 epic steaks worthy of the world’s greatest fathers.

Meat Market, Miami Beach, Florida 
Quickly seared to create a slightly caramelized crust, a few strokes of the knife reveal a bright red center (don’t you dare order this steak cooked greater than medium rare!). The 30-ounce Wagyu tomahawk steak sourced from Down Under goes well with any of the housemade butters, including lobster butter and chili mole butter. Or you can opt for one of the sauces, like atomic horseradish truffle or Jack Daniels pasilla chili garlic. Make a reservation at Meat Market.

Epic Steaks

Charlie Palmer Steak, New York, New York
Dry aged for 40 days, the porterhouse for two is a beautiful behemoth. Take it to even grander heights by topping it off with sautéed foie gras, half a lobster tail, or king crab. A side of truffled mac ‘n’ cheese wouldn’t be out of order either. Make a reservation at Charlie Palmer Steak.

Epic Steaks

Bourbon Steak, Washington, D.C.
Michael Mina’s restaurant decided to take its name literally by pairing its two namesakes. Executive chef Joe Palma offers a trio of dry-aged steaks sourced from Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley: an 18-ounce bone-in New York Strip, a 28-ounce bone-in rib-eye, and a 40-ounce bone-in tomahawk. The colossal cuts come with your choice of rare bourbons, such as 17-year-old Eagle Rare, 20-year-old Orphan Barrel Barterhouse, and 23-year-old Elijah Craig. Sounds like a match made in heaven. Make a reservation at Bourbon Steak.

Epic Steaks

Prime Italian, Miami Beach, Florida
Clocking in at 48 ounces, the porterhouse is intended for two – though you can share it with a third wheel tagging along if you’re feeling generous. Order it with your choice of chapeaux (literally French for “hats,” which is to say toppings), such as lobster or foie gras, as well as your choice of sauces, including horseradish cream, chimichurri, and peppercorn. Make a reservation at Prime Italian.

Epic Steaks

Cook Hall, Dallas, Texas
Don your ten-gallon hat and slip on your spurs before you order the supersized, spice rubbed cowboy ribeye. It arrives with smoked baked beans, collard greens, and a tangle of fried onion ribbons. Yee-haw! Make a reservation at Cook Hall.

Epic Steaks

RPM Steak, Chicago, Illinois
You have to prep you belly and your budget before you order this steak. Clocking in at an impressive 42 ounces (otherwise known as three frickin’ pounds), the Wagyu tomahawk costs $195 (otherwise known as a small car payment). The kitchen recommends it with jumbo asparagus, hen of the woods mushrooms, and the Millionaire’s Potato, which heavily features black truffles, of course. Make a reservation at RPM Steak.

Epic SteaksContinue Reading

Like Father, Like Son: For Father and Son Chefs, Cooking Is a Family Affair

Being a great cook might not be a genetically inherited trait, but having a parent who is a gifted chef definitely helps. In honor of Father’s Day, we talked to a trio of father and son chefs, the latter of which credit their dads’ work in kitchens for their own culinary success. These three sons are shining brightly as they carry on the family business.

Father and Son Chefs

Fabio and Luca Trabocchi

Fabio Trabocchi has a James Beard Award and has been named Food & Wine’s Best New Chef. But the chef-owner of Fiola, Fiola Mare, and Casa Luca in Washington, D.C., didn’t want to push either of his children to become chefs. Nonetheless, when his son, Luca, turned four, Fabio put him to work doing small tasks to help make Sunday suppers at home. By age six, Luca was using a dull knife to cut up ingredients. A year later, he asked his father if he could join him in the kitchen at Fiola. “I saw how hard he worked,” says Luca, who is now 12-years-old. “I thought what he was doing was pretty cool.”

The young toque started working the pastry station because his mother, Maria, didn’t want him next to open flames and hot grills in the kitchen. The pastry team taught him how to make a multitude of treats, including macarons, ice cream, chocolates, and bomboloni. The experience proved equally enriching for Fabio but on a different level. “Luca reminds me of the joy of being in the kitchen,” he says. “It’s refreshing and energizing.”

As Luca grew up, he helped his father with more complex cooking, such as grilling fish at the end of service when the kitchen calmed down or coming in early to help him make pasta from scratch. As they worked together side by side, his father has taught him culinary skills and imprinted his overriding philosophy of never giving up. “Cooking is an art,” says Luca. “There are mistakes you have to make in order to learn how to do it right.”

Luca still isn’t sure if he wants to pursue a career as a chef, but Fabio is content knowing his son will know how to cook a meal – and a good one, at that – after his training. “I just want him to be happy,” says Fabio. “I found ‘my voice’ through what I do. If he feels the same way, he’s more than welcome to have a career in the kitchen. If he doesn’t, that’s okay, too.”

Father and Son Chefs

Martial and Mathieu Noguier

Growing up, Mathieu Noguier spent a lot of time in the kitchen with his father, three-time James Beard Award nominee Martial Noguier and chef-owner of Chicago’s bistronomic. His dad would place him up on the pass, so Mathieu could watch the action unfold. When he was six-years-old, his father gave him a more active role by moving him to the pastry kitchen, where Mathieu would be charged with making macarons, madeleines, and soufflés. Occasionally, when he was bored with baking, Mathieu would be placed on salad duty. He helped out in this capacity until he was a teenager, but it didn’t inspire any desire to follow in his father’s footsteps. “I didn’t want to work in the industry,” he says. “I saw how hard it was and I knew the hours he was working. I wanted to stay away from all that. Plus, everybody who was doing it told me not to do it, so I figured they knew what they were talking about.”

When it came time to think about a career, he enrolled at King’s College in New York City and began working toward getting a degree in economics. However, the coursework didn’t ignite his interest. Mathieu began cooking at home to relax after class and finally decided to take a break from school to try his hand at cooking professionally. Back at his father’s restaurant, he began helping out with the morning prep work and doing the dishes. “My father is an old school guy, so he wanted me to start at the bottom,” he says.

He didn’t want his first full-time culinary job to be with his dad, though, so he pulled some strings to score at job at Melisse in Santa Monica, California. After that, he began a two-year stint working under his father at bistronomic.

His father likes to dole out lessons to the now 22-year-old chef, who recently took a break from the family business to do stages at In de Wulf in Heuvelland, Belgium, and Pottoka in Paris. “He’s entered his sage era,” says Mathieu. “The one piece of advice he’s given me that has made the biggest difference is that people who are successful are the people who are on time. He’s also always told me that cooking is easy; managing is the hard part.”Continue Reading

2016 RAMMY Award Winners: Cheers to DC’s Top Culinary Professionals

2016 RAMMY Award Winners

Last night, the capital’s culinary community gathered at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C., to fete the year’s finest industry people and places at the 2016 RAMMY Awards, presented by the Restaurant Association Metropolitan Washington (RAMW).

Congratulations to all the 2016 RAMMY Award winners, including:

Chef of the Year: Scott Drewno, The Source by Wolfgang Puck (pictured)

Favorite Gathering Place of the Year: Northside Social Coffee & Wine

Upscale Casual Brunch: Blue Duck Tavern

Everyday Casual Brunch: Duke’s Grocery

Favorite Fast Bites: Bub and Pop’s

Cocktail Program of the Year: 2 Birds 1 Stone

Beer Program of the Year: Right Proper Brewing CompanyContinue Reading