A Dozen Blue Ribbon Breakfast Sandwiches to Kick Start Your Day #BetterBreakfastMonth

The humble breakfast sandwich is no longer the purview of fast food joints. Now chefs are creating gourmet versions that eschew rubbery eggs and limp rolls for high-quality ingredients in creative presentations. Whether these sandos arrive on an English muffin or a biscuit or in a tortilla or a pita, they are guaranteed to give you a sunny disposition. In honor of Better Breakfast Month, here are a dozen blue ribbon breakfast sandwiches to kick start your day.

Boqueria-Soho, New York, New York
You’ll sound super fancy when you order the bocata de huevos, but you’re really just asking for the egg sandwich. This Spanish-styled startup sammie is far from ordinary, however. It comes with a fried egg, tangy mahón cheese, pickled red onions, cilantro, peppery pimentón aioli, and your choice of avocado or housemade pork sausage.

Blog Boqueria Breakfast_Sandwich1b-XL copy

Zengo, Washington, D.C.
When Sir Mix-a-Lot rapped, “My anaconda don’t want none/Unless you’ve got buns, hon,” he was clearly voicing his preference for breakfast sandwiches served on steamed buns. That’s what we like to think, anyway. At this Asian-Latin fusion joint, they pile the warm white pastries with bacon, scrambled eggs, salsa verde, and white Oaxacan cheese. We’re sure the “Baby Got Back” hit maker would approve heartily.


MP Taverna, Astoria, New York
This fully loaded egg souvlaki should be known as a Greek hangover cure. The pita comes packed with spicy lamb sausage, French fries, onions, and feta. In between bites, you can rationalize your questionable choices from the night before to your understandably skeptical dining companion.

Blog MPTaverna_Fully Loaded Egg Souvlaki 3_Courtesy of MP Taverna copy

Blue Duck Tavern, Washington, D.C.
Consider this break-of-day treat a high-end Egg McMuffin. Scrambled eggs, pork sausage, and American cheese (of course!) are packed between two halves of an English muffin gussied up with a spicy aioli. Ronald McDonald, sorry, but you are running a so-distant-we-can’t-even-see-you second in this race.

Blog Blue Duck Tavern Breakfast Sandwich copy

The Garden at the Four Seasons Hotel, New York, New York
Executive chef John Johnson evokes the bagelwiches you used to put together when you had breakfast at your bubbe’s house. A sesame-speckled circlet comes with ribbons of smoked salmon, plenty of cream cheese, tomatoes, red onions, and capers. Not included: your grandmother’s constant questions about why you haven’t settled down yet and produced lots of grandchildren for her to spoil.

Blog The Garden Restaurant at Four Seasons Hotel New York Catskill Smoked Salmon Bagel copy

Brio, New York, New York
You’ll need two hands to tackle this hefty breakfast burger. The epic edible comes piled high with a fried egg, apple wood-smoked bacon, a shroud of melted Provolone, arugula, and tomato jam. Remember, there’s no shame in requesting extra napkins.

Blog Brio Brunch Burger copyContinue Reading

‘The Next Iron Chef’ Episode 2: Marc Forgione on Bleeders, Breakfast, and Burgers

Chef Marc Forgione is back, surviving a second week, and discussing his big W this past Sunday night on the latest episode of “The Next Iron Chef.”

In his journal, Chef Forgione maps out how he'll innovate his assignment of chicken pot pie: "I knew there was never going to be a crust, more like a brown-butter-biscuit crumble."

You have to cook with doughnuts at the start of this episode. Do you have a favorite kind?

I lived above the Donut Pub on West 14th street and, call me old school, but I used to love their old fashioned donut to dunk in my coffee. There is also a place in the Lower East Side called the Doughnut Plant and they do a crème brulée doughnut — really cool.

Doughnut mania has sort of supplanted cupcake mania. What do you think of these food ‘crazes’ in general?

I think people get a little caught up in crazes, but I don’t really pay attention to most of the hype. I think crazes are amusing, overall. The burger is a perfect example of a craze that has taken over the restaurant scene. Today, it seems that every fine-dining restaurant has to have a burger. At my restaurant, we added  “The Burger”, which we serve at the bar for $24. It is extremely popular — a  28-day, dry-aged Creekstone Farm prime strip steak, with caramelized onions and bacon, arugula, and tomatoes on a homemade potato roll. It’s served with wedge yukon fries and housemade pickles.

Sounds sublime! You’re cooking in a tight space in this initial breakfast challenge — but is it all that different than many Manhattan kitchens?

The set at kitchen stadium is five times bigger than the station that I have at my restaurant. My kitchen is the size of an SUV!

Continue Reading