Election Drinks and Dishes: Red or Blue, It’s Up to You

Every four years, autumn shepherds the start of election season. As the leaves turn colors, so do cocktails and specials in restaurants around the country. In honor of that and National Voter Registration Day, we present election drinks and dishes that embrace the spirit of the campaigns and the candidates. Unsurprisingly, you’ll find many of these specials at restaurants in our nation’s capital.

SideBAR, New York, New York
This Union Square sports bar is game on with a couple of fun presidential candidate cocktails. They are: Hillary Clinton’s Secret Server, an Apple Martini which gives a nod to her stint as the Big Apple’s Senator but which also features blackberries because, well, you know. And, wait for it…The Donald Drumpf, a towering Apple Pie Punch (Amaretto, Sour Apple Pucker, and Goldschlager with gold flakes, and served in a Mr. Potato Head.) The cocktail is priced at $50 “because like Trump, it’s ‘huuge’,” says a restaurant spokeswoman. Oh dear. Make a reservation at SideBAR.

Election Drinks and Dishes

Del Frisco’s Grille, Hoboken, New Jersey
Del Frisco’s has debuted political burgers — The Donald and The Hillary — nationwide in its 21 restaurants “to give diners the chance to enjoy a couple of classic American burgers before moving to Canada.” Order The Donald and you’ll get a well-done prime beef patty (he’s known to order steaks well done), aged cheddar cheese, heirloom tomato, and Bibb lettuce on a gold bun served with a side of tiny pickles. The Hillary burger is classified — Grille guests can send an email to TheHillary@dfrg.com to receive burger details. Oh boy. Make a reservation at Del Frisco’s Grille.

Election Drinks and Dishes

FireLake Grill House, Minneapolis, Minnesota
The bar team here crafted a cocktail menu inspired by this year’s presidential mix: Feel the Bern, (Illegal Mezcal Joven, fresh lime juice, Sprite, and sriracha hot sauce). For the Republican presidential candidate “that always must have the last word,” FireLake came up with the Last Word, pictured, (J. Carver Grimm Farm Gin, Green Chartreuse, Luxardo, and fresh lime juice.) And, as a shout out to Ted Cruz being born in Canada, there’s the Maple Leaf cocktail with Evan Williams Bourbon, lemon juice, and maple syrup garnished with a cinnamon stick. Make a reservation at FireLake Grill House.

Election drinks and dishes

The Grill Room, Washington, D.C. 
Executive chef Frank Ruta of this D.C. politico favorite restaurant in the Rosewood Hotel has curated Red and Blue Plate prix-fixe lunch specials. A sampling: from the Red Menu, you’ll find the Texas-Style Pulled Pork Sandwich on Texas Toast. From the Blue Menu, check out the Maine Lobster Salad. And bartenders Cecilio Silva and Ismael Barreto crafted three election-themed cocktails to pair with the lunch specials — Thyme to Decide (gin, honey syrup, lemon juice, and blackberries, garnished with a thyme leaf), The Green Card (vodka, lime juice, simple syrup, Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur, and Blue Curacao, garnished with blueberries and lemon twist), and Pacific Blue (Mescal, honey, lime, ginger syrup and garnished with a lime wheel and basil leaves). There’s also weekly informal polling to see which cocktail gets the popular vote, too. Make a reservation at The Grill Room.

Election drinks and dishes

Lincoln, Washington, D.C.
This restaurant is a shout-out to Honest Abe, and if you cast your order for one of the presidential cocktails through Election Day, your sip preference will be tallied on a blackboard at the bar. The results of the cocktail voter poll are updated every Friday on the restaurant’s Facebook page. Drink choices include The Trump Tower, a smug twist on the classic Negroni with Earl Gre- Infused Absolut Elyx, Aperol, and Dolin Blanc. Hillary’s Inbox features nonclassified ingredients — Absolut Elyx, Drambuie, Blue Curacao, Orgeat syrup, lime juice, and soda. Make a reservation at Lincoln.

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Visual Sugar Rush: 8 Pastry Chefs on Instagram to Satisfy Your Sweet Tooth

Pastry Chefs on Instagram

Scrolling through your Instagram can give you a visual sugar rush. That’s because pastry chefs are using the  photo-driven app to show off their most dazzling creations, give diners a peek into the baking process, and hint at what sweet treats might be coming to their menus next. Here are eight highly accomplished pastry chefs on Instagram you should follow if you’re trying to figure out what delicious dessert to dive into next.

Scott Green, aka @chef_scottgreen, of Pavilion, Chicago

Before he got into pastry, Green attended fine arts school to study oil painting and ultimately received a degree in graphic design. His dexterity with composition, color, shape, and form are showcased in the drool-inducing photos he posts. “Different medium, different tools, same principles,” he says.

He shoots on a Nikon D3200 using a strobe light and holds his photo sessions in a storage closet in the hotel where the restaurant is located. “When my colleagues see flashes going off under the door, they know I’m shooting and they shouldn’t come in,” he says.

Rather than follow fellow pastry chefs for ideas, his feed is full of architects, textile enthusiasts, tattoo artists, and illustrators. “I don’t want to repeat what I’ve seen,” he says. “There are a lot of people who will shoot specifically for Instagram, but I want to just shoot pictures that I like.”

Pro Tip: “Be in tune with what your audience likes and doesn’t like. I don’t put savory dishes up. I don’t put up personal shots very often. It makes me cringe when I post a photo that doesn’t fit with that I do.”

Pastry Chefs on Instagram

Chris Ford, aka @butterloveandhardwork, of THE Blvd, Los Angeles

“I want to kill it with every single post,” says Ford. “No filler. I’m not going to put a picture up if isn’t going to further me, my team, or the larger community of chefs. This attitude makes you push yourself further and harder.”

The self-taught shutterbug uses a Canon Rebel XSi to turn his pastries into Instagram stars. Occasionally, he snaps shots of his adorable French bulldog, Josephine. One of his most liked posts (nearly 6,000 hearts) features Kim Kardashian and Kris Jenner. Along with Khloe and a film crew, they stopped by the hotel to score some of Ford’s well-loved cream puffs, which he topped off with edible pictures of Kanye and North. “Kris took my number, but I’m still waiting for the call,” says Ford.

We’re not sure what she’s waiting for, but we can’t urge her strongly enough to pick up the phone and call.

Pro Tip: “I shoot plated desserts from above, so you see the flow and the story of the dish. I want the viewer to see what I see.”

Pastry Chefs on Instagram

Brian Mercury, aka @mercurybrian, of Oak + Rowan, Boston

You won’t see any selfies in Mercury’s feed. No rants and raves. No political posts. His pictures fall into two distinct categories: family and food. “I’ve got a 3-year-old and an 11-month-old,” says the chef. “If I’m not cooking, I’m home with them.”

He captures his baked goods and his little ones using his iPhone 6. His go-to method for scoring a sweet shot of his baked goods is to place it outside or near a bright window and shoot it over the top. Occasionally, he’ll place a plated dessert on dirt or in the grass to add a natural element with interesting textures. “Sometimes you have to add some whimsy or put something in the background,” he adds. “But sometimes getting a good shot is just dumb luck.”

Pro Tip: “I’m a huge fan of negative space, both on the plate and in the background. I like bright white plates that makes colors pop.”

pastry chefs on instagram

Alex Levin, aka @alexnlevin, of Osteria Morini, Washington, D.C.

There’s a cult following for Levin’s best-selling warm dark chocolate cake. If he posts pictures of it too often, the restaurant gets swamped with orders and he runs the risk of running out. So, he keeps his feed lively with a mixture of his other desserts and a backstage look at the life of a pastry chef. “I enjoy inviting people to see what I do,” he says.

He wants to get his followers’ salivary glands working overtime, their hearts pumping, and have their eyes pop out of their head. “It’s about being a source of temptation,” he says. “It’s supposed to be food pornography.”

As well as enticing viewers, Instagram is a way for him to be a part of a larger community and to get a glimpse of what his peers are doing in kitchens around the world. “I get excited when I see what other chefs are doing,” he says. “It’s inspiring.”

Pro Tip: “You have to be smart about using hashtags, so you don’t annoy people.”

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Dine Like a Local in Boston: An Insider’s Guide to the Best Neighborhoods for Eating Well

Just because you’re a tourist in Boston doesn’t mean you have to eat like one; with some of the country’s best colleges, leading medical breakthroughs, and a true global population, Boston is a world-class city with world-class dining, all nestled into compact, walkable neighborhoods … just perfect for burning off some calories. Here’s where to dine like a local in Boston.

Faneuil Hall/North End

If your time here is short, a walk back in time at this landmark meeting hall with guides in 18th century costumes makes for kitschy fun. But besides mispronouncing Faneuil Hall (rhymes with “manual”), thinking this is the only place to eat in the area would be a mistake. While you will find any number of great pubs — the Hong Kong, Anthem (pictured), and circa-1654 Green Dragon among them — following the scent of garlic along the historic Freedom Trail makes for more fun. If you’re in the mood for a brewski, Bostonia Public House carries several varieties of Sam Adams, crafted just a couple of miles away, along with excellent cocktails, affordable three-course, prix-fixe lunches, savory bar bites, like parmesan polenta fries, and a great beet salad with whipped ricotta, pistachios, and honey.

Dine like a local in Boston

Those old enough to remember the most expensive public-works project in U.S. history, the Big Dig, will dig the Rose Kennedy Greenway, especially beautiful during the summer and fall with its 1.5-mile string of parks, a carousel, contemporary art exhibitions, and swings. A jaunt through brings visitors to either the waterfront with great views at Joe’s American Bar and Grill or Little Italy, where dozens of restaurants open their windows a la the Old Country. Hanover Street may be the most popular — especially Bricco for pre-dinner drinks, such as espresso martinis, and apps, like grilled octopus, — but tucked-away Mama Maria always delights. If it’s raining, check out the covered patio at Il Panino. And if you haven’t had your fill of history, don’t forget to visit Old North Church, where Paul Revere’s infamous “One if by land, and two if by sea” signal is said to have been sent. Is dessert more your scene? It’s worth waiting in line at Modern or Mike’s Pastry for a cannoli and watching servers artfully wind string crisscrossing the ceiling around takeaway boxes.

Cambridge

Penny-pinching college students are fans of iconic Mr. Bartley’s Gourmet Burgers, an institution since 1960, but there are plenty of other smart choices in this home of Harvard University. Creative cocktails at Parsnip like Breeze Through the Trees (featuring pine liquor, gin, lemon, grapefruit, and rosemary) are winning co-eds over, but with mouthwatering mains, like sea bass and duck, at big-plate prices better for when Mom and Dad are in town, Night Market is another new fave. Inventive Asian street fare features banh mi bites for just $2 and daikon fries for $7 with sake slushies to cut the spicy bite. There’s an impressive number of other new restaurants in Harvard Square, including The Sinclair (pictured), a mashup of chef Keenan Langlois creative comfort foods, and an adjoining music hall that’s Boston’s only outpost from independent New York company The Bowery Presents.

Dine Like a Local in Boston

Alden & Harlow is a hit among those too cool for school (don’t forget to check out their grilled carrots at dinner), but if you really want a good weekend brunch (and to “paahhk the cahh in Hahvahd Yahd” for just $3), check out PARK. It’s worth a walk afterward to the Harvard Museum of Natural History for a peek at the amazingly lifelike glass flower collection or to try and spot the narwhal in the Jumanji-like Great Mammal Hall. Cute boutiques, like Mint Julep and Black Ink, abound, and book-lovers will delight in the grand staircase at Harvard Coop (hint: they have a public bathroom).

Further afield in Cambridge’s Central Square, James Beard Award Winner Tony Maws cranks out just 20 bar burgers a night at Craigie on Main, and the mussels and frites at Central Kitchen are a great fill-you-up for just $14. Tech hub and MIT home Kendall Square is booming with several new restaurants, including Smoke Shop, one of Boston’s only BBQ options. Wash it all down at Mead Hall, with one of more than 100 beers on tap, or take a stroll through a real-life “secret garden” high atop the concrete jungle, accessible by elevator in a parking garage at 4 Cambridge Center.

Fenway/Kenmore Square

Most of the peanuts and Crackerjacks around the nation’s oldest ballpark don’t exactly hit it out of the park in a culinary sense, although there are plenty of great places to pre-game before a Sox game. Try Game On or Boston Beer Works — or if you missed out on tickets to the country’s oldest ballpark, stick around Bleacher Bar for a direct view of centerfield through the wall.

Fastball-loving foodies can enjoy a cloth-napkin experience even dressed in a ball cap and shorts at Eastern Standard, where sidewalk dining in the summertime is a grand slam with its butterscotch bread pudding and Jackson Cannon’s cocktails. Neighboring Island Creek Oyster Bar (pictured) is a perfect place to get a taste of bivalves from local suburb Duxbury and other fresh seafood.

Dine Like a Local in Boston

Seaport District/Waterfront

Boston’s newest and trendiest neighborhood has a distinct feel from the rest of Boston, especially with its contemporary rooftops and seaside sidewalk dining, making it a summer favorite for locals and visitors alike. It’s easy to pass an afternoon in the sun trying out the extensive tequila menu at Rosa Mexicano (sober up with guacamole smashed tableside) or with a tiki cocktail at the patio at Committee, where Sunday brunch features a DJ. For the best view from above, check out Outlook Kitchen and Bar at Envoy Hotel with cocktails made from local spirits, or admire the scenery both inside and out at the Institute for Contemporary Art, which welcomes chefs and DJs for its Summer Fridays entertainment series. It’s TGIF at Rowes Wharf Sea Grille, too, featuring free big-screen flicks projected onto a screen with al fresco dining weekly (Jaws makes for an ironic treat.) You can still enjoy the view even if it’s steamy or sprinkling from the third-floor, fully enclosed, glass-walled lounge at Legal Seafoods, or hop on over to Bastille Kitchen (pictured), where the new Sunday brunch offers another opportunity to enjoy the upscale-French-bistro-meets-ski-lodge digs.

Bastille Kitchen

There’s plenty else to do, with childish fun dumping tea into the harbor at the Boston Tea Party Museum, outdoor concerts at Blue Hills Bank Pavilion, and lawn games and DJs at Lawn on D.

Downtown Crossing

What was once the city’s gritty transit hub has been revitalized and now buzzes with shoppers flocking to international budget retailers like Primark and H&M and Massachusetts giants TJ Maxx and Marshalls. But it’s all about flash and panache at Yvonne’s, without a doubt Boston’s hottest new restaurant. Despite the waiting list — and list of celebrities who make it a point to come here for shared plates and massive sharable drinks (i.e. the ginormo Moscow Mule, below) — pastry chef Liz O’Connell’s creationslike an After Dinner Twinkieare always playful and never take themselves too seriously. That’s the point of dessert after all, isn’t it? Speaking of playful, many of the city’s theaters are nearby, including the Cutler Majestic and Opera House, and there are free fine-arts to be had on Boston Common park, which features free Shakespeare each summer; this year catch Love’s Labours Lost.

Dine like a local in Boston

South End

With its historic brownstones and meandering brick paths, the South End is romantic by day and sexy at night — but morning may be when this neighborhood hits its stride. Several of the city’s best brunches are all within a mile of each other, including Masa’s 2-course for $9.95, Tremont 647’s Pajama Brunch (come in your most comfortable attire), and Cinquecento, which is $9.95 for coffee, fresh juice, a starter, and a main. Even better, Cinquecento and nearby Gaslight offer free parking for a post-nosh stroll. Mimosas not your thing? Wink + Nod nails the speakeasy concept, or opt for a glass of wine with charcuterie at Coppa or Italian small plates at newcomer SRV, which stands for Serene Republic of Venice.

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Sail Away: 7 Dock and Dine Restaurants in New England

Boaters in cooler climes live for it — the day they can finally put their shrink-wrapped boat in the water. Here’s to the good life — summer days of boating to restaurants where you can dock and dine after a day on the water. We’ve got seven dock and dine restaurants in New England that offer transient dockage (but call ahead to the dock master to be sure). Cheers to summer at sea.

SALT Kitchen & Bar, New Castle, New Hampshire
Located in the elegant but unpretentious Wentworth by the Sea hotel here, SALT is a sought-out seafood spot, thanks to its handsome dining room. Dock your vessel (at the independently owned and operated dock located on property), and try the freshest of fish like the Hook and Line Caught Haddock (toasted ciabatta breadcrumbs, capers, tomato basil confit, lemon parsley butter ,and fingerling potatoes). Make a reservation at SALT Kitchen & Bar.

Dock and Dine Restaurants in New England

Rowes Wharf Sea Grille, Boston, Massachusetts
You can pull in to one of the 38 slips at The Marina at Rowes Wharf and celebrate summer by ordering the showstopper Roasted Two and a Quarter Pound Lobster (served with sweet corn pudding and saffron lemon butter) at this dockside restaurant in the five-star Boston Harbor Hotel. Tip: Dine and show your receipt — you can stay at the Marina for up to four hours. Note: Be sure to call ahead for docking space. Make a reservation at Rowes Wharf Sea Grille.

Dock and dine restaurants in New England

22 Bowens Wine Bar and Grille, Newport, Rhode Island
Keep it local and dig into Narragansett Steamed Mussels — caramelized leek, sherry garlic butter, potato sticks, and smoked tomato aioli, to be sipped with a seasonal cocktail like Wading on the Wharf (grapefruit vodka, elderflower, jalapeno, citrus soda). Dock at Bowens Wharf. Make a reservation at 22 Bowens Wine Bar and Grille.

Dock and Dine Restaurants in New England

Temazcal, Boston, Massachusetts
Dock your boat in Mexico — kidding, but if you moor up at Liberty Wharf, this Mexican-inspired restaurant has direct dock and dine access — just walk up the gangway. Take a seat on the waterside patio and order one of the fresh fish specialties like the Swordfish Salguero (fresh grilled swordfish steak, lobster, spinach, mushroom, tomatoes, saffron cream sauce, and Mexican rice). And, of course, don’t miss the guac. Make a reservation at Temazcal.

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