Top Boston Rooftop Bars: Where to Sip + Soak in the City Skyline

Whether you’re dining or just raising a glass, those who want to savor this awesome weather before the clocks turn in Boston have a plethora of options. Think Italian, sushi or BBQ, with craft cocktails and local brews to boot. Here are the top Boston rooftop bars — and a preview of what you’ll see.

Lookout Rooftop + Bar at the Envoy Hotel
Lookout may be perched high above Boston’s hottest neighborhood for nightlife, but if you don’t line up by about 4PM in the afternoon the line may snake around the block for the stunning Seaport views at this trendy newcomer. Head bartender Michael Ray works together with Beantown brewery Harpoon and local spirit makers like GrandTen for WireWorks gin and Bully Boy for rum, vodka, and whiskey to craft artisanal cocktails. The latest seasonal hit — the Rum for Your Life, with pineapple, lime, and simple syrup — celebrates the last blast of Indian summer. Views through modern glass walls offer a prime panorama of the city skyline and Boston Harbor. Post-game with noshes like tuna poke, flatbreads, and locally caught scallops from chef du cuisine Tatiana Rosana at Outlook Kitchen and Bar, also at Envoy Hotel. Make a reservation at Outlook Kitchen and Bar.

Boston Rooftop Bars

Legal Harborside
Good things come in threes at Legal Harborside, where the trio of sangrias (red, white, and strawberry) are the perfect way to toast the all-seasons rooftop bar and lounge —and three very different dining experiences on each floor. The first is a casual concept with “picnic tables” and a market, the second offers fine dining and an interior reminiscent of a ship’s dining room, and the third is the cherry on top: a four-season space with a copper fireplace and retractable glass walls and ceiling just right to admire those harvest moons glimmering over the marina. The adult slushies and Top Deck Margarita are the top choices to wash down a menu focusing on sushi and oysters. Make a reservation at Legal Harborside.

Boston Rooftop Bars

Though the vintage airstream trailer converted into a bar may be the most memorable décor on the Coppersmith roof deck, the drinks are far removed from the Solo cup beverages found in most double-wides. The mood is festive and casual, especially this fall as football lovers get a kick on Sunday and Monday game days when executive chef Jason Heard busts out a “rivals menu” including regional fare from the New England Patriots’ opposing teams including pierogies from Cleveland and crab cakes from Baltimore. Hungry for more? The Air Deck is the only space you can order “Air Deck Picnics,” family-style bites like BBQ, tacos, and sliders served up in vintage Radio Flyer wagons for 6-20 people (must be ordered in advance). Make it a party and tap your toes to live music being offered Sunday afternoons on the deck from 4-7PM, too. Make a reservation at Coppersmith.

Boston Rooftop Bars

 Top of the Hub
Top of the Hub may be in the heart of the Boston, but the drink menu hits are straight up Caribbean. Lead bartender Arley Howard serves up frothy pina coladas in a city largely devoid of frozen cocktails, in addition to a plethora of mojitos. One of the most popular tipples is the Level 52 — so named for the floor the restaurant occupies in the landmark skyscraper of the Prudential Center — featuring vodka and Chambord topped with Champagne in an ice-cold martini glass with raspberries. It’s great to raise a toast to the stunning views across Boston Harbor up to 80 out, and try one of the more than 3,000 bottles of bubbly or wine in the Hub’s two large wine rooms. Any and all drinks are a terrific way to get those dancing feet loosened up for live music or as a precursor to new executive chef Stefan Jarausch’s menu, which changes seasonally. Make a reservation at Top of the Hub.

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Trendspotting: Awful Offal; Fish Goes Green; Forkage Fees Make Author See Red; Restaurant Diners to See Fewer Tomatoes, and More

* It’s the awful side of offal as Rocky Mountain oysters show up on more menus. Blech. [The Atlantic]

* Move over green eggs and ham: Fish is getting in on the action as well. [Chicago Tribune]

* A restaurant asked Cake Bible author Rose Levy Beranbaum to fork over cash for a “forkage” fee for a — you guessed it — cake. [Chowhound]

* Some restaurants have secret menus that anyone can order so long as you know the secret names. Trust me when I say you’ll probably be better off if you don’t indulge in any of these things. [Coupon Spy]

* Cold weather has killed a lot of tomatoes and they’re in short supply at restaurants. [CNM]

* Restaurants in Dallas are going green. [Dallas Morning News]

* Restaurants in Chicago are serving pretzel bread. []

* It’s patio season in Beantown. [Grub Street Boston]

* Garlic goes green — literally. It’s already a vegetable, so it’s not like it’s not “green,” but some varieties are also actually green. [Los Angeles Times]

* Want to find sustainable fish? There’s an app for that. [Miller-McCune]

* More restaurants in New York are going green with rooftop gardens. [New York Magazine]

* It’s tough to keep kosher in Connecticut. [The New York Times]

* Restaurants have better house wines. [The Reporter-Vacaville]

* You can take a nap in Napa after you dine on first-rate cuisine, thanks to top-notch inns with equally impressive restaurants. [San Francisco Chronicle]

* Bars and booze are bringing more business in to restaurants. [South Florida Sun-Sentinel]

* The Star Tribune has had a food section for four decades and in that time, they’ve, admittedly, endorsed some pretty silly trends. [Star Tribune]

* Taiwan restaurants take sustainability a step further. [Trendspotter]

* Our diners up north have the skinny on what’s going to be trendy in food in the future, which has already arrived, apparently. [Vancouver Sun]

* A DC restaurant goes dark but not in the bad way. [Washington Post]