Dine Out for Heroes in NYC on November 5th

Dine Out for Heroes Dine Out for Heroes in NYC on November 5thThis Wednesday, you’re invited to Dine Out for Heroes at a participating restaurant in New York City. In support of The Bob Woodruff Foundation, restaurants will donate $1 per person to help support the long-term rehabilitation, education, employment and quality of life needs of injured veterans.

“We’ve always been so proud of Stand Up for Heroes, and I am looking forward to the inaugural year of Dine Out for Heroes. We have seen what can happen when a movement of generosity inspires thousands more to act, and we know the New York community will come together to salute our injured service members and their families yet again,” said Bob Woodruff, ABC News journalist who co-founded the Bob Woodruff Foundation after he was critically injured by a roadside bomb that struck his vehicle while reporting from Iraq. The Bob Woodruff Foundation is a national nonprofit dedicated to ensuring that post-9/11 injured service members, veterans and their families thrive long after they return home.

Participating restaurants include All’Onda, Betony, Carbone, The Cecil, Le Bernardin, Locanda Verde, Nobu, Rotisserie Georgette, The Russian Tea Room, and many, many more. Book a table and do your part to support our returning injured veterans by dining out on November 5th.

November Restaurant Weeks: Save Before the Holidays!

CRW 2014 November Restaurant Weeks: Save Before the Holidays! The holidays are awesome because presents! Food! Family! Friends! And, did I mention cocktails? Unfortunately, the presents part can leave your piggy bank looking a bit lean. This is exactly why we adore dining discounts during November restaurant weeks! Discover where you can save while you share delicious meals with your favorite foodies in the weeks to come.

* We’re craving Cleveland Restaurant Week and tasty three-course dinners for just $33, November 3-15. Reserve now.

* Say “Aloha!” to Restaurant Week Hawaii. Take advantage of gourmet prix-fixe meals, November 17-23. Reserve now.

Hudson Valley Restaurant Week has what you’re hungry for with $20.95 lunches and $29.95 dinners, November 3-16. Reserve now.

* Saving during Jersey Shore Restaurant Week is a sure thing. Enjoy $20.14 and $30.14 dinners, November 7-16. Reserve now.

Long Island Restaurant Week awaits with $27.95 three-course dinners, November 2-9. Reserve now.

Continue reading…

Congratulations to Chicago’s 2014 Jean Banchet Nominees

l20blog Congratulations to Chicagos 2014 Jean Banchet Nominees
A scallop dumpling with black truffle from nominated restaurant L20.

The nominees for Chicago’s prestigious Jean Banchet Awards were announced yesterday. Held annually, the awards acknowledge culinary excellence in the Windy City. The winners will be announced early next year, on January 30, at the 18th annual Grand Chefs Gala to benefit the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

Congratulations to all the nominees, including:

Restaurant of the yearBokaL20, and Moto

Best new restaurant: Parachute, Salero, and TETE Charcuterie

Best neighborhood restaurant: A10 Hyde Park

Chef of the year: Abraham Conlon of Fat Rice, Thomas Lents of Sixteen, Chris Pandel of Balena and The Bristol, and Lee Wolen of Boka

Rising chef of the Year: Ashlee Aubin of Salero

Best chef de cuisine: Chris Marchino of Spiaggia, Ali Ratcliffe-Bauer of Brindille, John Vermiglio of A10 Hyde Park, and Erling Wu-Bower of Nico Osteria

Pastry chef of the year: Dana Cree  of Blackbird, Claire Crenshaw of Moto, Meg Galus of NoMI, and Greg Mosko of North Pond

Continue reading…

Root Vegetables Rock: 15 Rave Reviews for Turnips

turnip blog Root Vegetables Rock: 15 Rave Reviews for TurnipsIt warms my heart — and my stomach — that the unassuming turnip is turning up on more menus these days. The only longtime advocates I can personally recall of this root veggie are my mother, who served a giant bowl of mashed turnips each Thanksgiving (a practice started by her frugal father), and my instructors at the French Culinary Institute — we did a lot of tournage on turnips. A lot! A once-unsung ingredient in contemporary American cuisine, turnips are easy to grow and terrific for storage over the lean winter months. They’re also very low in carbohydrates, thus making them a great substitute for potatoes and other root produce with a high glycemic index. Read on for raves for turnips — in pizza, polenta, tacos, and more — from recent OpenTable reviews. 

Dressler’s, Charlotte, North Carolina: ”Food, service, and overall dining experience was excellent. I had the steak with turnips and greens. Gave me a different outlook on turnips.”

The Gage, Chicago, Illinois: ”Hubby had the prosciutto-wrapped trout stuffed with turnips and kale; he did not stop raving about his meal for two days after!”

Junto, Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania: ”We split the ribeye (with potatoes, turnip, and arugula). The vegetables and bread were uncommonly excellent.”

The Helmand Restaurant, Baltimore, Maryland: ”My favorite entree is the vegetarian platter, but lamb dishes are also excellent. We almost always get the bindi (okra) as a side dish for the table, and these folks can make even turnips tasted like a gourmet find.”

Indaco, Charleston, South Carolina: ”Turnip pizza was a revelation, and so was pasta with braised brisket and a perfectly roasted chicken.”

Kanella, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: ”The appetizers are wonderful. We had lamb dumplings in a wonderful sauce, a refreshing sliced turnip salad, and great fresh hummus that is light years from the supermarket kind.”

The Kirkland Tap & Trotter, Somerville, Massachusetts: ”Side dish of turnip was a heartwarming tribute to the fall.”

Legume, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: ”Perfect portion sizes saturated with flavor — we had swordfish with braised turnips, amazing grilled peach salad, jerk squid, and bluefish pâté. So good that we went back the next night.”

Continue reading…

San Francisco 2015 Michelin-Starred Restaurants: Book a Table Today!

SPQR Blog San Francisco 2015 Michelin Starred Restaurants: Book a Table Today!OpenTable is pleased to highlight the honorees in the MICHELIN Guide San Francisco 2015. Forty restaurants are included, with four Bay Area restaurants receiving the Michelin three-star level, the highest recognition in the culinary world, and six achieving two Michelin stars. Thirty restaurants earned one Michelin star. Kusakabe and Maruya are new to the list.

Being included in the respected MICHELIN Guide is a sign of excellence and quality. In the U.S., New York is one of only three cities where Michelin publishes an annual guide. The others are Chicago and New York. The MICHELIN Guide New York 2015 was published October 1, and the MICHELIN Guide Chicago 2015 will be released on November 12.

Congratulations to all the recipients, including:

Three Stars: Benu, The French Laundry, The Restaurant at Meadowood, and Saison.

Two Stars: AcquerelloAtelier CrennCoiManresa, and Quince.

Continue reading…

OpenTable Diners Can Now Settle the Check with Apple Pay

We are pleased to announce that diners with an iPhone 6 or iPhone 6 Plus and iOS 8.1 using the Pay with OpenTable mobile payments feature can now settle the check using Apple Pay.

Diners who have enabled Apple Pay and book at participating Pay with OpenTable restaurants can simply view their check in the OpenTable iPhone app, select a gratuity amount and settle the check with a single touch. Diners can then get up and go whenever they’re ready.

Blog Apple Pay OpenTable Diners Can Now Settle the Check with Apple Pay

Pay with OpenTable is currently available in New York City, San Francisco, and Washington, D.C., and we plan to roll out the feature across the nation by introducing it to a total of 20 cities before year end. To find out more about OpenTable mobile payments, watch “Life’s too short to wait for the check” and visit http://pay.opentable.com/ to view the current list of participating restaurants. Restaurants who are interested in providing their guests with the experience of paying with OpenTable can learn more at http://pay.opentable.com/restaurants.

Worst Wine List Trends: #DinersChoice Award-Winning Sommeliers Speak

iStock 000022788693Small Worst Wine List Trends: #DinersChoice Award Winning Sommeliers SpeakThis week, we celebrated the 2014 Diners’ Choice Award winners for the Top 100 Wine Lists in America. Like snowflakes, no wine list is exactly like another. Each is a reflection of a sommelier’s unique perspective on the wines that will shine alongside a restaurant’s menu. Similar to menus, however, wine lists can fall prey to bad trends that diminish a diner’s experience. We asked this year’s award winners to share their thoughts on the worst wine list trends. Read on for their, ahem, juicy responses.

Lack of smaller pours. AIDA Bistro & Wine Bar proprietor Joe Barbera bristles at restaurants offering glass or bottles only with no option to try a taste with a two or three ounce pour, for example. “This also doesn’t provide the customer the ability to create their own flight.”

Too few wines by the glass. “For my personal taste, it is the lack of wine available by the glass. At Amelie, we offer more than 100 wines by the glass and we try to cover many terroirs, geographic areas, and various winemaking techniques. Our prices give our customers a chance to try new wines and see all the differences. Many wine lists have extensive options of wine by the bottle, but the high prices make it difficult for the guests to try these amazing wines. I think a wine list can be made with exceptional wines at affordable prices,” says Germain Michel of Amelie.

Showcasing only large production wines. “Everybody sells wine these days: Amazon, grocery stores, gas stations – you name it. And they all seem to be carrying the same mass-produced wines. This is the trend I am noticing in some restaurants. The wine lists are offering the same wines as a gas station. Maybe it’s because they think people will recognize the wine names,” says Tom Bush, retail wine manager, at Balaban’s.

Poor organization. As Dan Sachs of Bin 36 points out, “It’s difficult for typical diners to know how to navigate a wine list, and, often, lists can be organized by price or regions. While these may make sense from the restaurant’s perspective, if the diner is not familiar with, say, Italian reds, organizing the list by region is not very helpful. In the end, we want our guests to make a selection that will be enjoyed and enhance the rest of the dining experience – and it shouldn’t be stressful.  A wine list can be a tool to reduce or ramp up the stress level.”

Having a big list merely for the sake of having a big list. Cooper’s Hawk Winery & Restaurant winemaker Rob Warren says, “The worst trend that I see is overcomplicating the wine list for the sake of having a big list. Most customers choose wine based on familiarity and price. It is important to have the popular varietals on the wine list, and even some more obscure ones, but within those varietals there are often too many choices at or near the same price point. Pick a $20, $40, and $60 Cabernet Sauvignon that go well with the food you produce. Do the same for the other varietals on your list, and your customers will be much less intimidated.”

High prices and low quality. Amer Hawatmeh, owner of Copia Restaurant and Wine Garden, isn’t a fan of wine lists that feature low quality and high price or high quality with even higher prices and limited choices. “We strive to resolve all of this at Copia by offering a great selection of more than 1,100 varieties of wine that represent the world, at retail prices.”

Tired wines by the glass. “Exploring wines by the glass is a great way to learn more about the endless world of wine. But one of the disturbing trends we see is that of restaurants offering only predictable wines by the glass,” says Domaine Hudson proprietor, Mike Ross. “We offer a range of distinctive wines by the glass. We take pride in helping patrons expand their horizons. Very often, these discoveries become customers’ bottle favorites.”

A lack of cohesion. Elaia wine director and advanced sommelier Andrey Ivanov states, “Too often I find a wine list without a sense of purpose or theme. Whether it is regional, style-driven, whatever the tie that binds, a list should tell a story. It is a look into the creative mind of the person who put it together: what they enjoy, what they are passionate about, and how they choose to communicate that passion to their guests. Guests rely on the beverage professional to guide them through the sometimes-nebulous world of wine; this is our craft, this is our passion, this is our contribution. At the end of the day, without proper context, it is still just rotten grape juice.”

Refusing to evolve. Matt Roberts, wine director for Eno Vino Wine Bar and Bistro, says, “There are wonderful, established wineries, wines, varietals, and producers that have stood the test of time because they are consistent with their quality and are a MUST to be represented on any wine list. One thing that we try to do at Eno Vino is not only have these constants represented on our list, but always save room and space for the unique, the ‘boutiquey,’ and the small producer. It’s essential to always keep your list revolving and evolving! It’s not necessary to change everything; switch a few things up here and there. There is no greater feeling than someone trying something new and loving it!”

Focusing solely on arcane wines. Fearrington House Restaurant wine director Maximilian Kast reveals, “I find it troubling that some wine buyers are creating lists that focus only on esoteric wines. Don’t get me wrong; I love esoteric wines, and we have them on our list, but when a guest comes in to your restaurant and does not recognize a single wine on your wine list, you have set an uncomfortable tone for their evening. Having a list which has some ‘mainstream’ wines from good producers balanced with some more esoteric wines will actually make guests more prone to choose the esoteric wines, because they feel like they have a choice, as opposed to having it forced upon them.”

Lists driven by wine sales reps. “I have seen that, at least in our area, a lot of restaurants pay very little attention to their wine lists and leave it to their ‘liquor’ sales rep — not even a wine sales rep — with total disregard to the link between food and wine, offering what the reps need to sell and not what would be best with the food they are preparing. You can find the very same wines in seafood restaurant, pizzerias, grill, and barbecue places. To us, wine is as important as food to make it a complete experience,” says Griffin Market owner Riccardo Bonino.

Continue reading…

Food + Fashion Meet at The New Potato ‘Pay with OpenTable’ Party in NYC — with Slideshow

Foodies and fashionistas gathered with The New Potato founders Danielle and Laura Kosann at Il Buco Alimentari in New York City to help us celebrate the recent launch of OpenTable mobile payments. Attendees, including restaurateur David Rabin, Eater photographer Daniel Krieger,  Momofuku beverage director Jordan Salcito, and VICE Munchies Editor-in-Chief Helen Hollyman, sipped wines and cocktails curated by Merchants of Beverage and munched on a menu that included crispy artichokes, octopus a la plancha, gnocchi with artichokes and chanterelles (SO GOOD!), salt-baked whole fish, roasted short ribs, and more. Take a peak at some pictures — and try out OpenTable payments in New York, San Francisco, and Washington, D.C.!

PS: Don’t miss these stylish suggestions for dining out this weekend from The New Potato – here and here.

OpenTable Reviews Reveal #DinersChoice Top 100 Wine Lists in America — with Slideshow

As we look forward to toasting the holidays in the coming months,we are pleased to honor the 2014 Diners’ Choice Award winners for the Top 100 Wine Lists in America. These awards reflect the combined opinions of more than 5 million restaurant reviews submitted by verified OpenTable diners for more than 20,000 restaurants in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Highlighting restaurants with deep-yet-accessible wine lists that include the affordable and the extravagant, the complete list of award winners spans 28 states and includes, Acquerello in San Francisco, Marche Bacchus in Las Vegas, and Vino Vino in Austin. While California, home to more than a thousand vineyards, has the greatest number of winners with 16, the list indicates that wine appreciation isn’t limited to the country’s wine-producing regions, with Ohio boasting 12 winners, followed by Illinois with nine, and Maryland with eight. Texas has six honorees, while Missouri, New York, and Virginia all have five; Michigan and Washington each have four. States with three winning restaurants apiece include Florida and Wisconsin. Colorado, Nebraska, North Carolina, and South Carolina, respectively, have two award winners. Alabama, Arizona, Delaware, Hawaii, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, New Jersey, New Mexico, Nevada, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee are also represented.

The Diners’ Choice Awards for the Top 100 Wine Lists in America are generated from more than 5 million restaurant reviews collected from verified OpenTable diners between October 1, 2013, and September 30, 2014. All restaurants with a minimum “overall” score and number of qualifying reviews were included for consideration. Qualifying restaurants were then scored and sorted according to the percentage of qualifying reviews for which “notable wine list” was selected as a special feature. The complete list may also be viewed at http://www.opentable.com/m/best-wine-list-restaurants-in-america/.

Did your favorite wine list win an award this year? Let us know here or over on Facebook!

OpenTable Mobile Payments March into Washington

blog dc payments1 OpenTable Mobile Payments March into WashingtonWe are pleased to announce that Pay with OpenTable is now available in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area.

In addition to Washington, D.C., Pay with OpenTable is currently available in New York City and San Francisco. OpenTable plans to roll out the feature across the nation by introducing it to a total of 20 cities before year end.

To pay with OpenTable, diners who book at participating restaurants simply add a credit card in the OpenTable iPhone app before they dine and can then view and pay their check with a few taps. There’s no separate app to download; no codes to enter; and no scanning or barcodes involved. Diners who Pay with OpenTable simply get up and go whenever they’re ready.

Inaugural Pay with OpenTable restaurants in the D.C. metro area include: Continue reading…