Restaurants

10 Restaurants with Their Own Farms: Happy #EarthDay

In honor of Earth Day, we’ve rounded up 10 restaurants that take the farm-to-table concept to another level — they have their very own farms. Talk about private stock. Celebrate Earth Day and sustainability with a reservation at one of these eateries that takes locavorism to a hyper local level!

Pawtomack Farm 41. Black Cat Farm Table, Boulder, Colorado + Black Cat Farm, Boulder, Colorado.

Chef Eric Skokan wasn’t a trained farmer when he started Black Cat Farm, but he likely qualifies as one now. After trial and error and advice from fellow farmers, he is now a skilled self-taught tractor driver and producer of American Mulefoot pigs and grower of sublime heirloom tomatoes, both of which you’ll find on the menus at Black Cat Farm Table and gastropub Bramble & Hare.

2. Blue Hill at Stone Barns, Pocantico Hills, New York + Stone Barns Center for Food & Agriculture, Pocantico Hills, New York.

Dan Barber was inspired by the past to forge the future in establishing one of the nation’s most important restaurant-farm partnerships. Blue Hill opened on Stone Barns’ 80 acres in 2004, and the farm and the restaurant serve as a model for sustainable agriculture and cuisine.

3. JG Domestic, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania + Luna Farm, Ottsville, Pennsylvania.

Jose Garces and his family purchased an all-organic 40-acre farm not just as a family getaway; the farm, named for the Garces’s dog and the region’s breathtaking harvest moons, Luna Farms provides freshly grown produce for chef Garces’s east coast restaurants, including Amada, Tinto, and Volver.

4. L’Espalier, Boston, Massachusetts + Apple Street Farm, Essex, Massachusetts.

Apple Street Farm was founded in 2009 by L’Espalier chef McClelland, and its 14 acres serve as the primary source of organic harvests of everything from artichokes to zucchini, free-range poultry and pork, egg-laying hens, honey, and more for L’Espalier. The restaurant is 26 miles away, and chef McClelland is known to hand-deliver just-picked product to his team of chefs.

5. The Mulefoot Gastropub, Imlay, Michigan + Romine Family Farm, Imlay, Michigan.

The Mulefoot’s namesake comes from the heritage breed of pork that is served at the gastropub and raised at their local family farm located about eight miles from the restaurant. Chefs and twin brothers Matt and Mike Romine look after the pigs when they’re not working in the kitchen of their restaurant, but father Joe primarily tends to the heritage hogs, first procured from local Toad Hall Farm in Emmet.

6. PRESS, St. Helena, California + Rudd Farms, St. Helena, California.Continue Reading

Pull Up a Chair: #100opentables Inside Look

ICYMI (which seems impossible), on April 9, 2015, 100 restaurants in 30 cities around the world hosted nearly 350 diners for once-in-a-lifetime #100opentables dining experiences. If you didn’t score a seat — or even if you did — check out snippets from these unique meals and find out why the #100opentables night was, and OpenTable is, all about what happens around the table.

 

Celebrating National Garlic Month at The Stinking Rose (Because Where Else?)

st-portrait moonDid you know that April is National Garlic Month, and yesterday was National Garlic Day? We think it’s only fitting that the mighty clove, also known as the stinking rose, gets its very own month and day. After all, it’s been seasoning food and fighting off illness and garden pests (not to mention warding off vampires) for centuries. According to The Oxford Companion to Food, “It has been known in China since antiquity, and was an important article of diet in ancient Egypt and in classical Greece and Rome.” Despite its popularity, however, the patrician class frowned upon the accompanying smell, with the Roman poet Horace even writing that garlic is more harmful than hemlock.

While we diners only officially fete garlic and all its stinky goodness during April, Dante Serafini and Jerry Dal Bozzo, owners of The Stinking Rose in the Bay area celebrate it 365 days a year. Located in the heart of San Francisco’s Italian neighborhood, the restaurant plows through about 1.5 tons of the stuff a month, featuring garlic in virtually every dish on their menu. For guests who don’t want to stop their allium sativum intake with spaghetti, there’s even garlic chocolate ice cream. Continue Reading

In Season: Spring Restaurant Weeks

spring restaurant weeksWe love everything about spring, from the first seasonal vegetables that grace our plates when we dine out to the warmer weather that means al fresco eating is in our future. On top of that, we’re looking forward to another round of restaurant weeks in cities across the country. Try a new restaurant, visit an old favorite — or both — during a restaurant week near you.

* Seattle Restaurant Week awaits with $15 lunches + $30 dinners, April 12-16 and April 19-23 (excluding April 18 + 19). Reserve now.

* Manayunk Restaurant Week has multi-course lunches + dinners for $35 and under, April 12-24. Reserve now.

* Jersey Shore Restaurant Week washes ashore with  $30.14 dinners, April 17-26. Reserve now.

* Buckhead Restaurant Week offers Atlanta diners delicious $25 + $35 dinners, April 18-26. Reserve now.

* Chicago Chef Week highlights the city’s best chef-driven restaurants with $22 lunches + $44 dinners, April 19-24. Reserve now.

* Walnut Creek Restaurant Week delights with $20 lunches and $30 + $40 dinners, April 19-26. Reserve now.Continue Reading