OpenTable Tab Now Lets LA Diners Put It on Their Tab

OpenTable Tab

Dine like a regular and pay like a boss in Los Angeles with OpenTable Tab, a new payment experience that gives diners a way to quickly and easily settle a check at any time as well as providing restaurants with a unique way to deliver classic hospitality. Currently available at more than 75 restaurants in Los Angeles, OpenTable Tab will be introduced in more U.S. cities later this year.

To experience OpenTable Tab,  simply tap the Tab feature when you book your reservation at a participating restaurant. Once you’re at the restaurant and ready to leave – or at any time during their meal – you can let your server know you want to put your meal on your OpenTable Tab and then get up and go whenever you’re ready. When no cash or cards exchange hands at the table, you’re free to live in the moment.Continue Reading

2016 RAMMY Award Winners: Cheers to DC’s Top Culinary Professionals

2016 RAMMY Award Winners

Last night, the capital’s culinary community gathered at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C., to fete the year’s finest industry people and places at the 2016 RAMMY Awards, presented by the Restaurant Association Metropolitan Washington (RAMW).

Congratulations to all the 2016 RAMMY Award winners, including:

Chef of the Year: Scott Drewno, The Source by Wolfgang Puck (pictured)

Favorite Gathering Place of the Year: Northside Social Coffee & Wine

Upscale Casual Brunch: Blue Duck Tavern

Everyday Casual Brunch: Duke’s Grocery

Favorite Fast Bites: Bub and Pop’s

Cocktail Program of the Year: 2 Birds 1 Stone

Beer Program of the Year: Right Proper Brewing CompanyContinue Reading

Meet the Artists Behind the #MenuDecoded Illustrations

#menudecoded

To complement the results of our recent Harris Poll online survey around menu terminology, we wanted to create a #menudecoded glossary to help educate and delight people who might be confused about certain words. As with any compelling glossary or dictionary, illustrations are key to enhancing a user’s (or in this case, a diner’s) experience. The OpenTable design team looked to the creative community to help with this aspect, partnering with well-known illustrators Ping Zhu, Keith Shore, Harrison Freeman, Brianna Harden, and Eddie Perrote, who share a combined client list of The New York Times, Penguin Books, Dwell Magazine, American Express, and Vice, among others. Here, each artist shares a few insights about themselves, their process, and the terms they worked with.

Keith Shore (Yuzu, En Brodo, En Papillote, Primi, Terrine)

Keith Shore is the art director for Danish brewery Mikkeller and works from his home studio in the Philadelphia suburbs. His favorite term to illustrate was yuzu. He says, “I’ve made many beer labels that center around this awesome fruit. It’s a great shape to draw and has a fun, loud color palette.” Follow Keith on Instagram @keithashore + Twitter @keith_shore.

#menudecoded

Brianna Harden (Okonomiyaki, Gougère, Harissa, Lardo, Crudo)

Brianna Harden is an illustrator, book cover designer, and self-proclaimed adventurer living in Brooklyn, New York. She notes, “My creative work involves making paintings (usually of food or people) primarily for editorial clients and designing book jackets for Penguin Random House. When I’m not drawing or designing, I embark on frequent travels to just about anywhere that allows me to rock climb and eat good food.” The terms she most enjoyed bringing to life? “The gougères and the crudo. There’s something about the delicate crudo that reminds me of floral arrangement — every ingredient is carefully considered for size and balance. It was a compositional challenge to depict a perfectly arranged little piece of fish. The color scheme also turned out to be my favorite, as the vibrant pinks and greens were delightful to paint. My other favorite was the gougères — not so much to draw but to sample. Shortly after I received this illustration assignment, I went to visit my friend where he bartends at the Brooklyn restaurant French Louie.  Without knowing about this project, he brought out one of their appetizers — a basket of warm gougères  with cheese. It was my first time trying the delicious pastries, and I’m obsessed with them now.” Follow Brianna on Instagram @brianna_harden + Twitter @brianna_harden.

#menudecoded

Eddie Perrote (Piri Piri, Shiso, Meuniere, Amuse Bouche, Semifreddo)

Artist Eddie Perrote is a professional illustrator, designer, and, he adds, amateur food eater. He resides in Brooklyn, New York. When asked what term he liked tackling best, he revealed, “I’d say the Amuse Bouche was my favorite to illustrate because of the unique role that appetizers play in terms of food pairings — I could get wackier with it!” Follow Eddie on Instagram @eddieperrote

#menudecodedContinue Reading

Menu Jargon Confounds Diners: Top Misunderstood Menu Terms Decoded

Top Misunderstood Menu Terms

Can’t tell shiso from yuzu? Don’t know a gougère from gochujang? You’re not alone. As culinary trends evolve (or stage a comeback), the terms diners are finding on menus can be confusing and impact how they order at a restaurant. A recent online survey conducted by Harris Poll revealed many diners believe some restaurant menus are more confusing than they need to be (29%), are concerned that ordering a menu item made with an unfamiliar ingredient will ruin their dining experience (56%), or feel they will be wasting their money if they don’t enjoy their meal (74%).

The survey findings also revealed several menu terms that more than half of diners do not know the meaning of, and inspired the OpenTable design team to work with illustrators to create a visual Menu Jargon Decoder to demystify the visualization, meaning, and pronunciation of confusing menu terms, including okonomiyaki, bibimbap, piri piri.

The survey, which was conducted online by Harris Poll in March 2016 on behalf of OpenTable, found that an overwhelming majority of diners (91%) say they are more likely to order a dish they are not familiar with if it has additional menu features. Diners also indicated that the future for digital menus may be bright with more than half saying photos of the menu items (53%) or a glossary of menu terminology (30%) would make them more likely to order a dish they are not familiar with.

Additional findings include that nearly 2 in 5 (37%) of diners choose a restaurant based on how familiar they are with the items listed on a menu. When diners encounter a term they didn’t understand on a menu, most (67%) have asked the waiter to explain what it is, but some (42%) have asked fellow diners at their table if they are familiar with the term. Nearly 1 in 5 (18%) ordered a dish with an unfamiliar ingredient or term as a challenge to experience something new. Men were more likely than women to do so (21% vs. 14%, respectively).

According to the survey, at least half of diners say they do not understand the following menu terms in ranking order:Continue Reading